Riveters gas masks African American Officers African American Soldiers 1 Mule Rearing pilots in dress uniforms The pilots doughboys with mules

Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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July 23, 2019

"We are a very high visibility American Legion Post since we are located in Paris, France."

Bryan Schell

Our Commission's recent commemoration efforts in Versailles, France put us in touch with some friends whom we haven't seen in a while -- the members of the world-famous American Legion Post #1 in Paris. These Legion members stand on a long tradition, one that celebrates a direct line to our World War I veterans. Post #1 is the first, and the oldest, American Legion post outside of the United States, and was created by people who had just seen the Great War end months before. Since that time, they have fulfilled a unique and special role in representing our American veterans in France, and throughout Europe. Vice Commander Bryan Schell took some time to tell us about his special post, their history, and their current activities.


World War One Centennial Commission Announces the "A.E.F. Memorial Corps"

A.E.F. Memorial Corps

The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission has announced the “A.E.F. Memorial Corps” (American Expeditionary Forces Memorial Corps) to recognize Veterans, Military, Patriotic, Historical, Service, and Community organizations that raise funds to help build and provide ongoing support for the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC. The A.E.F. Memorial Corps will induct national, state, or local organizations (or any local chapters such as American Legion or VFW posts) which hold fundraisers for the benefit of the national World War I Memorial. Those Legion and VFW Posts which have already made donations to help build the Memorial will be inducted at the organizations' respective national conventions this summer. Click here to find out more about the A.E.F. Memorial Corps, and how your organization can become a member.


4th Annual Camp Doughboy World War I History Weekend this September in NYC

Camp Doughboy 1

The fourth annual Camp Doughboy World War I History Weekend comes to Governors Island National Monument on September 14 and 15. Each day will bring living history, reenactors, authors, experts, vintage vehicles, and animals. This is the largest free public WWI exhibition in the United States. Reenactors representing the Allies and Central Powers—as well as civilians in Edwardian-era attire—are invited living history participants. The centennial of the service members returning to Governors Island is in 2019 and this group of volunteer reenactors will share the story of WWI participants. Click here to learn more about Camp Doughboy 2019, and the planned events and activities in September.


Honors given; marker placed; RIP, Private Ulysses Grant Moore

Ulysses Grant Moore flag presentation

Richard Mize is pastor of Trinity Presbyterian Church in Oklahoma City. Last weekend, he helped give belated honors to Army Private Ulysses Grant Moore, a century after he served in World War I, and 55 years after he died. As Mize writes, "Why such honors were overlooked, and why this marker never made it here to his burial site are unknown." Click here to read the entire story of how 55 years after the fact, "It took a compelling series of discoveries that started by happenstance" to finally deliver to Private Moore the much delayed and much deserved honors from his nation for his service in World War I.


Germany's World War I Debt Was So Crushing It Took 92 Years to Pay Off

German tank being demolished

At the end of World War I, Germans could hardly recognize their country. Up to 3 million Germans, including 15 percent of its men, had been killed. Germany had been forced to become a republic instead of a monarchy, and its citizens were humiliated by their nation’s bitter loss. Even more humiliating were the terms of Germany’s surrender. World War I’s victors blamed Germany for beginning the war, committing horrific atrocities and upending European peace with secretive treaties. But most embarrassing of all was the punitive peace treaty Germany had been forced to sign. The Treaty of Versailles didn’t just blame Germany for the war—it demanded financial restitution for the whole thing, to the tune of 132 billion gold marks, or about $269 billion today. How—and when—could Germany possibly pay its debt? Click here to read more about how the process took 92 years and another World War to be completed.


Fillmore County, WI restores World War I memorial entrance for 100th anniversary

Fillmore County Fairgrounds WWI Memorial Entrance Plaque

"Fillmore County remembers its history," said Nathan Pike, the Olmsted County veteran’s service officer and emcee of last week's celebration of the restoration of the World War I Memorial at the Fillmore County Fairgrounds entrance. The structure was built 100 years ago, erected to honor soldiers returning from World War I. "There were over 1,000 residents of Fillmore County that enlisted or were drafted into service during the first World War," said Pike. "Forty-eight of them were killed in action, and they did not return to Fillmore County." Click here to read more about the restoration project, and how Fillmore County remembers its citizens who served in WWI.


George Dilboy, the first Greek-American who fell in battle during World War I

George Dilboy

In 1918 George Dilboy was killed on a battlefield near Belleau, France after fighting so courageously that he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, America’s highest medal for bravery. Dilboy was the first Greek-American soldier who fell in the line of duty. The Greek-American’s conspicuous heroism was so outstanding that he was recognized and honored by three US presidents. Woodrow Wilson signed the authorization awarding Dilboy the Medal of Honor, Warren G. Harding brought his remains back to be buried with honors at Arlington National Cemetery, and Calvin Coolidge presided at his final burial there. Click here to read more about the life and heroism of George Dilboy.


Milford celebrates: 100 years ago, WWI ended & the American Legion was born

Ernest F. Oldenburg

The American Legion in Milford, Michigan is celebrating 100 years since the end of World War I and the birth of America’s largest veteran’s organization. The Ernest F. Oldenburg American Legion Post 216 held an open house last weekend. Around 1945, Henry Ford sold the property at 510 W. Commerce Road in Milford to the American Legion with the stipulation that the post be named after his friend Ernest F. Oldenburg, a soldier from the Milford area who served with the 32nd Red Arrow Division and was killed in action in France in 1918. In 1946, the new building opened. Click here to read more about the World War I centennial commemoration activities by American Legion Post 216.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube.  Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Red Summer Riots

Episode #132
Highlights: Red Summer Riots 1919

100 Years Ago: Red Summer Riots - Dr. Jeffrey Sammons | @02:10

Great War Project: Retrospective - Mike Shuster | @15:15

Introducing the A.E.F. Memorial Corps - Host | @25:15

New Digital Download: "Hello Girls" Single - Host | @27:35

Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch - Host | @31:00


Doughboy MIA for week of July 22

Doughboy MIA

This week we bring you something different from Doughboy MIA. 

Many have wanted to know the breakdown of missing; those on land as opposed to those lost or buried at sea (L/BAS), the number of unknowns, etc. Over the last few months we have worked hard at scrutinizing the list and crunching the numbers in order to detail those who were L/BAS, especially as no complete or accurate record of them was ever made available.  So, in answer to the questions that come in, here are the numbers by cemetery and then in totals:

Aisne-Marne Cemetery = Unknown burials - 249 Tablets of the Missing - 1060

Brookwood Cemetery = Unknown burials - 41 Tablets of the Missing - 564 (All on the Tablets are L/BAS.)

Flanders Fields Cemetery = Unknown burials - 21 Tablets of the Missing - 43

Meuse-Argonne Cemetery = Unknown burials - 486 Tablets of the Missing - 954

Oise-Aisne Cemetery = Unknown burials - 601 Tablets of the Missing - 241

Somme Cemetery = Unknown burials - 138 Tablets of the Missing - 333 (Note that one Unknown grave at Somme contains seven sets of remains.)

St. Mihiel Cemetery = Unknown burials - 137 Tablets of the Missing - 284

Suresnes Cemetery = Unknown burials - 6 Tablets of the Missing - 974 (The number of missing are all L/BAS and includes 14 names believed to be L/BAS but for which further research is required.)

Total (Total Missing in Action from the war, no matter the reason) = 4,453

Unknown burials = 1,679

Subtracting the Unknown burials from the MIA's leaves 2,774 unrecovered soldier dead.

Subtracting the L/BAS total of 1,538 from the unrecovered total leaves 1,236 unrecovered soldiers dead that remain out on the battlefields.

Our goal at Doughboy MIA is to make an accounting of all these men. Over the coming years we will be researching each man individually to make a determination as to what happened to him and publishing a report. We have already been able to get several together thanks to the contributions made to our organization, which just goes to show that with your assistance we are making a difference!

Want to help? Come on over to the Doughboy MIA website at www.ww1cc.org/mia and make a tax deductible donation to our non-profit organization. Every dollar you give IS making a difference! And remember:

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Robert J. Laplander
Directing Manager for Doughboy M.I.A.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Mint Coin Set

2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar Sets

No longer available from the U.S. Mint!

These Official World War I Centennial Silver Dollar Sets are only available here on the WWI Centennial Commission's online gift shop.

NOTE: Each set comes with 2 separate coins. Each set will accompany the Official Doughboy Design alongside your choice of Military Branch. 

"The United Mint certifies that this coin is a genuine 2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar, minted and issued in accordance with legislation passed by Congress and signed by the President on December 16, 2014, as Public Law 113-212. This coin was minted by the Department of the Treasury, United States Mint, to commemorate the centennial of America's involvement in World War I. This coin is legal tender of the United States."

A portion of the proceeds from your purchase will help build the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.



James Edward Coffey

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

James Edward Coffey

Submitted by: Donald P. Vincent {Nashua, NH American Legion Post 3}

James Edward Coffey born around 1897. James Coffey served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

James Edward Coffey, the first soldier from Nashua, NH to die in battle in World War I, was born on April 22, 1896, to Daniel J. and Catherine (Dillon) Coffey.

He attended Nashua schools and St. Patrick Church, and in June 1917, became one of the first Nashua men to enlist in the Army at the outbreak of the war. He was assigned to Company D, 103rd Infantry, 26th Division, and trained in Concord and Westfield, Mass.

Coffey and his unit, the famous 26th Yankee Division commanded by Maj. Gen. Clarence R. Edwards, deployed overseas in September 1917.

Read James Edward Coffey's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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July 9, 2019

DAR donation

Community Project Leads to National WWI Memorial Donation from Lucinda Hinsdale Stone Chapter of the DAR 

The effort to build the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC has brought partners from many different parts of the country, and from many different groups of people. The stories they bring are extraordinary -- their personal/historic ties to World War I, their belief in remembering our veterans, their commitment to giving the lessons to future generations. Among the most extraordinary stories of support comes from Kalamazoo County, Michigan -- specifically from the Lucinda Hinsdale Stone Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Their members created a special project to mark the centennial of the end of World War I. As part of that project, they included a fundraiser aimed at helping build the memorial in the nation's capital. We had the opportunity to speak to Elizabeth Kraatz, Vice Regent of the Lucinda Hinsdale Stone Chapter, to hear the full story.

If your historical, patriotic, or community organization is interested in doing a fundraising project to support building the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC, while at the same time raising funds for your group's own activities, take a look at the Commission's WWI Poppy Seed Program here.


Iowa Middle School teacher visits WWI sites in France via National History Day

Ann Jackson

Iowa teacher Ann Jackson landed in France recently for a history-filled trip to explore World War I sites as part of Memorializing the Fallen, a National History Day program sponsored by the US World War I Centennial Commission, and supported by Commission Founding Sponsor The Pritzker Military Museum and Library. The program included 16 other U.S. teachers. Jackson was chosen out of 334 applicants to take the trip. Along with American cemeteries, the group also checked out German war trenches, chapels, monuments and more. Click here to read the entire interview with Jackson, who discusses seeing the areas directly impacted by World War I, and thinking about how decisions made 100 years ago have shaped future events.


Professors dig through history to prove WWI hero deserves a Medal of Honor

William Butler

Sgt. William Butler served with the renowned all-black 369th Infantry Regiment during World War I. His heroism made headlines after he rescued five Americans who had been taken prisoner, while killing at least five Germans. The 369th got a parade on their return, and Butler received the Distinguished Service Cross and France's highest military honor, but not the U.S. Medal of Honor. In a CBS TV News interview, Professor Jeffrey Sammons of New York University said that's largely because of a concerted and well-documented effort by senior white officers to denigrate the performance of black soldiers. Sammons has joined forces with professor Timothy Westcott of Park University in Missouri as part of the World War I Valor Medals Review initiative to right what many see as a terrible wrong. Click here to read the entire CBS interview, and watch video to learn more about the Valor Medals Review.


"Number, please?" 'Hello Girls' answered the call in World War I

Grace Banker

Grace Banker of Passaic, NJ served in some very high places during World War I. For 20 months, she lived like a soldier at a time when the Army didn't allow women in the ranks. She wore a U.S. Army uniform with three stripes on her sleeve and carried a helmet and a gas mask to the front lines in France. And like any soldier, Banker had to keep her cool under fire, working the switchboard at Gen. John Pershing's headquarters amid the thunder of artillery shelling. After the war, Banker eventually moved to New York state, never to return. Recently her granddaughter came to Passaic to see the house where Banker grew up. Click here to read the interview with Banker's granddaughter, and learn more about efforts to recognize the contributions made by the Hello Girls to the U.S. war effort a century ago.


Austin World War I exhibit shows how U.S. peace turned to near anarchy

Austin WWI exhibit

The United States entered the European showdown of doomed empires late but with enormous impact, especially back at home, as a densely organized and visually sharp exhibit, “WWI America,” argues at the Bullock Texas State History Museum. The exhibit runs through Aug. 11. This exhibit, which originated with the highly regarded Minnesota Historical Society in St. Paul, Minn., includes a fair share of personal stories, such as ones about “doughboys” like Charles Whittlesey, part of a “Lost Brigade” caught behind German lines, and José de la Luz Saenz, who fought for democracy in France and against racial segregation in the U.S. Click here to read more about the Texas exhibit, and see more photos from the museum.


"Students often discover WWI to be far more interesting than they expected."

Reston VA school exhibit

A major reason why the US World War I Centennial Commission does what it does is to ensure the stories, and the lessons, of World War I are given to our coming generations. So, last month, we were delighted to hear from Mr. Hugh Gardner, and Ms. Lachlan Dodge, who work with the IdeaVisions Academy in Reston, Virginia. There, they helped their high school level students to create and carry out a World War I research project that took place over this entire school year. We wanted to hear more, and sent them a number of questions about the project -- and they asked students Daniel Heintz and Nolan Powers to be the spokespersons for the effort.  Click here to read the responses from the students, and learn more about their ambitious educational undertaking.


Camp Sherman versus the Mound City Earthworks in Ohio

Soldiers on mound at Camp Sherman

The Scioto Valley in South Central Ohio is home to numerous important Pre-Contact American Indian earthworks. The visible heritage of Ohio's Pre-Contact American Indians are the mounds and earthworks that dot the landscape in Southern Ohio. One of the most important Pre-Contact earthworks is the Mound City Earthworks, part of the Hopewell Cultural National Historical Park near Chillicothe, Ohio. One hundred years ago, the Mound City Earthworks were partially destroyed by Camp Sherman, a World War I cantonment. Click here to read the entire article by Paul LaRue of the Ohio WWI Centennial Committee, and learn more about the conflict between war preparation and historical preservation during World War I.


369th Experience Band ties HBCU musicians to WWI Black history

369th during Fleet Week

Leonard E. Colvin of  the Philadelphia Tribune newspaper put the spotlight on the 369th Experience this week via their close connection to the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the United States. Cohen noted that "In 1919 when the Treaty of Versailles ended World War I, two years after the U.S. entered the fight with France and Great Britain against Germany, 44 Black colleges existed. Today, 100 years later, there are 101 public and private HBCUs, and they and their students are playing an important part in reclaiming the role African-American troops and artists played in that conflict." Click here to read the entire article on the Philadelphia Tribune newspaper web site.


Learning the wrong lessons from WWI?

Gabriel Glickman

Gabriel Glickman is an adjunct professor of history and is currently writing a world history book provisionally titled, “The Rise and Fall of World History: Avoiding Historical Amnesia in 21st Century Classrooms.” Writing an OpEd in the Washington Post recently, Glickman posits that America and the world may, during the centennial of the end of World War I, be getting the wrong answers to the key question about WWI: "What lessons can we learn from it to stop future localized crises from spinning out of control?" Click here to read Glickman's entire thoughtful essay reflecting "on the cause of a war that sucked in established and aspiring powers alike during a time of peace."


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Ike's Big Road Trip

Ike during 1919 convoy

In July 5th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 129, host Theo Mayer recalls a big story from 1919, as a young 28-year-old Lieutenant Colonel named Dwight David Eisenhower joins a convoy of military vehicles on a test trek from Washington, DC to San Francisco, California - not in a matter of days, but over the course of more than two months. Eisenhower, who  volunteered to accompany the convoy as an observer for his tank division, takes away some big lessons that still share our transportation infrastructure and traveling habits today. Click here to read the entire story of the Cross National convoy of 1919, including how young Dwight Eisenhower even pulled a rabbit of of his hat along the way.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Truck stuck in the mud during Ike's Big Road Trip

Episode #130
Highlights:
Ike's Big Road Trip

Host - Theo Mayer

100 Years Ago This Week: Ike’s Big Road Trip -
Host |@ 01:50

Remembering Veterans: Veterans History Project - Col Karen Lloyd USA (ret.) |@ 11:15

Spotlight On the media: Ernst Jünger Documentary - Elsa Minisini |@ 22:20

Articles & Posts - Weekly Dispatch - Host |@ 33:55


Doughboy MIA for week of July 8

Richard Parks

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Supply Sergeant Richard Parks. Enlisting at 19 at Columbus Barracks, Ohio on 11 September, 1916, Richard A. Parks was the only child of Thomas C. and Clara B. Parks of Ellijay, Georgia. Assigned to Company L, 9th Infantry, he served on the Border with them before going overseas on 18 September, 1917, as a Supply Sergeant. Part of the 2nd Division, the 9th saw considerable action in France, including at Belleau Wood. As a Supply Sergeant, Parks’ job was an extremely important one, making sure that the needs of the troops on the front line were met. He couldn’t fail. Lives were on the line. The 2nd Division launched an attack in the Soissons sector on 18 July, 1918, with the aim of eliminating a German salient aimed straight for Paris. It was on this first day of the attack that while on a supply mission forward, Sergeant Parks was severely wounded in action. He later died of his wounds and it appears that his battlefield grave was never located. Very little else about this case is known at this time.

Want to help shed some light on Sergeant Parks’ case? Consider making a donation to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Bundle

World War I Collector's Bundle!

Collect all commemorative coins and lapel pins in one purchase!

  • Coins: Each piece is die-struck, bronze alloy, with nice gravity (unlike cheaper zinc coins)
  • Enamel inlay provides premium detailing and finish
  • Each coin and pin comes with its own commemorative packaging, adding value and gifting appeal.

This collection includes a WWI Centennial Coin, Centennial Lapel Pin, Bells of Peace Commemorative Coin, Bells of Peace Commemorative Lapel Pin, and U.S. Victory Lapel Pin.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.  A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the Uni



Jurian (Jerry) J. Dykstra

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Jurian (Jerry) Dykstra

Submitted by: Janna Dykstra Smith {granddaughter}

Jurian (Jerry) J. Dykstra was born around 1896, Jurian (Jerry) Dykstra served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

Jurian (Jerry Joe) Dykstra, a son of Dutch immigrants, was inducted into the U.S. Army at the age of 21 on July 26, 1918, in Orange City, Iowa. He left the farm, near Middleburg (Sioux County), using an old cardboard suitcase and travelled to the newly built Camp Pike, north of Little Rock, Arkansas. His military training consisted mostly of close order drill.

He corresponded with Cynthia Meerdink, a young girl from Hull, Iowa, whose own brother, Henry, was already in France. Jerry’s October 6th letter from Camp Pike was written 36 days before the Armistice. It was a “lonesome Sunday” and he was sitting outside with a number of other letter writers. “Someone is shaking the table.” He finished the letter inside “with my tablet on my knee for table.” Jerry compliments Cynthia on a photograph that she has sent him, “That is surely a handy picture you sent me as it is very handy to carry around this way.”

Read Jurian (Jerry) J. Dykstra's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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July 2, 2019

"It is not only one generation who may forget its history, it is an entire society."

John Heckman

The world of World War I historians has no voice more unique than John Heckman. Also known as the Tattooed Historian, John has had long experience with teaching, and creating Living History impressions for other genres, including the Civil War, before he started to really devote his maximum efforts to World War I. John is very active online, hosting a successful Podcast series, Twitter, and Facebook social media accounts. John's take on history is very fresh -- he brings modern sensibility, personal viewpoint, and soldier-level context, to his interpretation of historical topics. John has also been a great friend and partner to the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, participating in several of our key events, including parades, commemorations, and the design rollout of the National World War I Memorial in Washington DC. Click here to read this thoughtful interview with a one-of-a-kind historian.


The New York Times: Was the Treaty of Versailles a Victory for Democracy?

Woodrow Wilson at Versailles

Ted Widmer, a distinguished lecturer at the Macaulay Honors College of the City University of New York, took to the pages of the New York Times last Friday to explore the centennial of the signing of the Treaty of Versailles, and how President Woodrow Wilson's belief in his own righteousness undermined his vision for world peace via the treaty.  Click here to read Widmer's in-depth look at the critical events of 100 years ago.


Arkansas Great War Letters Project: "Reading such letters makes the events of the past real."

Michael Polson

Michael Polston has a remarkable story to tell. Curator of a history museum in Central Arkansas, he saw a rare opportunity to do something unique to mark the World War I Centennial period, something that would be immediate, accessible, relevant, and that would have value that would last long into the future. This project was a "Letters" project, what the Arkansas Historical Association called it “one of the most valuable of the efforts marking the centennial.” Michael's journey to success with the project is quite unique, and he took some time to tell us about it.


How WWI transformed economic warfare

Blockade

Though World War I officially ended 100 years ago with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles, in its overwhelming influence on economic sanctions since 1919, the Allied blockade never really stopped. While it’s the narratives of destruction and change, from the bloodbath of the Somme to the triumph of Vladimir Lenin in Russia, that have captured the public imagination about the war, the way the war transformed economic warfare should also be seen as one of its central legacies, one that continues to shape international relations today. Click here to read the analysis by Phillip Dehne, professor of history at St. Joseph’s College, N.Y., in the Washington Post.


A country poet and World War I soldier

Ben Clifford

Vermont writer Sharon Lakey remembers "a story in North Danville that has held a warm spot in my heart for many years. Ben Clifford, an old country poet, walked the back roads of North Danville and left his handwritten poems in neighbors’ mailboxes." But preparations for the upcoming July 4th celebration in North Danville brought to light some undiscovered writings by Clifford on World War I. Click here to read more about how "Ben gives us an inkling of the reality of that war, a stark memory that stayed with him for the rest of his life."


Historian's 10-year quest for WWI New York soldier’s grave ends in success

Terry Kratwurst

We previously chronicled in DISPATCH the story of Terry Krautwurst, who devoted 10 years of his life documenting the men and women of Genesee County, New York who served in World War I. But there has been a nagging loose end to the amazing historical project, one that Kratwurst had almost given up on solving. Click here to read the remarkable story about how a last-resort request uncovered the missing piece of the the puzzle that enabled Kratwurst to put the "Mission: Accomplished" label on his World War I historical project in 2019.


Minnesota family donates WWI-era artifacts to county museum

Kenneth S. McKay.

Those who serve in war have a tendency to not talk much about that experience. If they do, it is typically much later in life. That was the case with Kenneth S. McKay, who served his country in World War I as a member of Company L, the Redwood Falls, Minnesota National Guard Unit.  Click here to read the entire story of how a bequest from one part of the McKay family to another brought a collection of items from Kenneth's time in the service to rest in the local museum, where their century-old story can now finally be told.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Spotlight on the Media:
An Interview with WWrite Blog Curator Dr. Jennifer Orth-Veillon

Dr. Jennifer Orth-Veillon

In June 28th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 129, host Theo Mayer interviewed Dr. Jennifer Orth-Veillon. Dr. Orth-Veillon is a writer, researcher, and war literature expert who has curated the Commission's WWrite blog for the past several years. The blog is self-described as exploring WWI's influence on contemporary writing and scholarship and has earned a loyal following of over 30,000 avid readers. Click here to find out how WWrite came to be, and to learn more about how World War I changed writing and literature forever.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

4th of July 1919

Episode# 129
4th of July, 1919

Host - Theo Mayer

4th of July, 1919 -
Host |@ 02:05

Extra Extra: The Treaty is signed - Mike Shuster |@ 08:40

The WWrite Blog -
Dr. Jennifer Orth-Veillon |@ 14:00

Bladensburg Peace Cross -
Host |@ 25:50

Articles & Posts -
Host |@ 31:15


Doughboy MIA for week of July 1

Robert McClain

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Private Robert McClain. Born in Rome Georgia in 1898, Robert John McClain enlisted in the Georgia National Guard on 16 July, 1917 at Atlanta and was assigned to Company A, 5th Infantry, GNG, whose duty station was Camp Wheeler, at Macon, Georgia. The year before, this unit had been federalized for duty on the Mexican Border as Company A, 122nd Infantry. Following the declaration of war in 1917, the 122nd had been assigned duty to the 31st ‘Dixie Division’, which would go overseas as a replacement division in September, 1918.

By that time however, Private McClain had already sailed for France aboard the troopship Orduna on 20 June, 1918 as a member of Company #5, Camp Wheeler June Automatic Replacement Draft, which had been drawn from Camp Wheeler trainees. Ten days later he was ‘Over There’, and a week after that, having received some machine gun training while with the 122nd, McClain was assigned to Company B, 150th Machine Gun Battalion, 42nd ‘Rainbow’ Division. He was with them but a short time when, on 28 July, 1918, he was killed in action, having been in France less than a month.

Private McClain is memorialized on the Tablets to the Missing at the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery at Belleau Wood. Nothing else is known about his case at this time.

Want to help shed some light on Private McClain’s case? Consider making a donation to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Black Pique Polo Shirt

Navy Blue Doughboy Polo Shirt

Perfect for summer! Inspired by the iconic image of an American Doughboy, you can wear your American pride with this Made in the USA polo shirt. An informal term for a member of the U.S. Army or Marine Corps, “Doughboy” is especially used to refer to the American Expeditionary Forces in World War One. Largely comprised of young men who had dropped out of school to join the army, this poignant lone silhouette of a soldier in trench warfare serves as a reminder of those who sacrificed so much one century ago. Shirt features: Navy with white Doughboy embroidery. 100% combed cotton pique, 6.2 oz. pre-shrunk fabric. Shirt has 3 wood-tone buttons, and side seam design for shape retention. Mens’ sizes available S – 2XL. Proceeds from the sale of this item will help to fund the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial. A Certificate of Authenticity is included.



George William Schreader

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

george-william-schreader

 

Submitted by: George F. Schreader {Grand Nephew}

George William Schreader was born around 1894. George Schreader served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1916 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

Official U.S. Army portrait of First Sergeant George William Schreader, 28th Infantry Division, 103rd Engineer Regiment. Photograph was probably taken in France in early 1919 during the period of occupation following the Armistice.

George William Schreader served with the U.S. Army in WWI beginning with his enlistment in the Pennsylvania National Guard in 1916, continuing through the war in France with Pennsylvania’s 28th Infantry Division in 1918, and into the post-war occupation in 1919 before returning to America for discharge.

The story of my great uncle, George William Schreader, has been recounted in a book entitled, “Sergeant Doughboy – Journal of a WWI American Soldier” by G. F. Schreader. I published this book in 2015, which was my second book in a three-part series that chronicles the military connection of four successive generations of men in the Schreader family, all named George. I am the fourth George in the family. I came to write this series of books as a result of merely attempting to record some family military history beginning with the post-Civil War era (my great-grandfather), through both World Wars (my great-uncle and my father), and through the Vietnam War, in which I served.

Read George William Schreader's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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June 25, 2019

Treaty of Versailles Centennial event in France will benefit construction of new U.S. National World War I Memorial

Versailles treaty signing

On June 28th, in honor of the Centennial Anniversary of the Treaty of Versailles, a day of remembrance, commemoration, and education, will take place in Versailles, France. The first of The Paris Peace Treaties, this treaty officially ended the state of war between the European Allied Nations and Germany. Presenting Sponsor, the Pritzker Military Museum & Library, along with National WWI Museum and Memorial, and the Doughboy Foundation, will support the activities hosted by the legendary Palace of Versailles. Click here to read more about the Treaty of Versailles Centennial commemorations, and how proceeds from one event will benefit the construction of the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC.


"I truly cared about those who served and wanted to make that known."

Aiden Coleman

Eagle Scout Service Projects are supposed to be challenging, but Aiden Coleman was more ambitious than most. His project: erect a World War I memorial in his Indiana hometown to honor those locals who served in the Great War. Aiden notes that "My troop leaders weren't so enthusiastic, I think they thought it might be 'too ambitious.' And in some ways they were correct."  But Aiden overcame the challenges of researching the local WWI veterans, and raising the needed funds, and the new Memorial was dedicated on Armistice Day 2018.  Click here to read the whole story of an Eagle Scout's project that aimed high because "I wanted to do something more meaningful. I knew that I wanted to do something based around World War I."


National WWI Museum & Memorial offers exclusive video and images to mark Centennial of 1919 Inter-Allied Games

Inter-Allied Games

The scheduled Olympics in 1916 were canceled due to World War I. While the Olympics resumed in 1920, a seminal event featuring renowned athletes from across the world took place in 1919 in the aftermath of the first truly global conflict in human history. Held from June 22 – July 6, 1919 outside of Paris near the site of the 1900 Olympics, the Inter-Allied Games featured hundreds of male athletes from nations across the world aligned with the Allies during World War I competing in 13 sports. During the course of the completion, more than 500,000 spectators witnessed some of the globe’s best athletes – past, present and future. Click here to read more about how the Inter-Allied Games came about, and how the games "served as a vehicle for healing the wounds from the most catastrophic war to that time in human history.”


UK service marks 100 years since Scapa Flow navy scuttling after World War I

SCapa Flow service

A poignant service was held in Scotland to commemorate the centenary of the scuttling of the German High Seas Fleet in Scapa Flow in 1919. More than 50 German ships were sunk in the waters off Orkney to prevent them becoming spoils of war on 21 June 1919. A service was held above the sunken wreck of the warship Dresden. During the service a bell recovered from the wreck of the Von der Tann was rung by the grandson of German commander Admiral Ludwig von Reuter. Click here to read more about the scuttling 100 years ago, and the joint UK/German commemoration events.


Court Rules Bladensburg WWI Peace Cross Can Stand On Public Land

Bladensburg Peace Cross

The United States Supreme Court ruled last Thursday that a gigantic Latin cross on government land in Bladensburg, Maryland, does not have to be moved or altered in the name of church-state separation. The justices reasoned that the 40-foot cross was erected nearly a century ago as a World War I memorial, not an endorsement of Christianity.  Conceived in 1919 by bereaved mothers of the fallen and completed by the American Legion six years later, the war memorial has become part of the Bladensburg town landscape. Click here to read more about the Supreme Court's ruling, and the possible effects on other WWI memorials with religious symbolism.


Vandals spray-paint WWI Memorial in KC

KC memorial wall vandalism

Police are looking for two people who vandalized the Dedication Wall of the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City early Tuesday, June 18. The vandals struck about 1 a.m. at the Liberty Memorial, when two people were seen spray-painting  the words “Glory to the fallen martyrs . . .” before running away. The graffiti appears to reference the June 1986 prison revolts in Peru where 250 inmates died. The Dedication Wall holds the bronze busts of the five Allied leaders — Gen. Baron Jacques of Belgium, Gen. Armando Diaz of Italy, Marshal Ferdinand Foch of France, Gen. John J. Pershing of the United States, and Sir Admiral Earl David Beatty of Great Britain — present during the site dedication on Nov. 1, 1921. Click here to read more about the vandalism, and efforts to apprehend the perpetrators.


The story of Eva Crowell

Eva Crowell

When Mary Fritts noticed three log-shaped monuments in Lyons, Nebraska with "World War I" and the same last name--Crowell--on each of them, she took a closer look. "One inscription read Eva Crowell, WWI nurse. Being the only woman from Lyons to serve in WWI, I wanted to learn her story," Fitts recounted. Click here to read more about Fritts' research, and how Eva Crowell came to be added to the new Lyons Veterans Plaza memorial.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Making Peace: Harder Than Making War? A Roundtable Discussion

Versailles headlines

In June 21st's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 128, host Theo Mayer put together a special edition of World War I Centennial News: an expert panel of historians and subject matter experts for a lively discussion of the complicated and consequential peace process that followed the war. The participants come from three countries and have different academic, literary, and professional credentials. Click here for a fascinating look at an extraordinary time in world history, as told by the people who study it.

Education:
Toolkits for WWI Educators with
Dr. Jennifer Zoebelein

Dr. Jennifer Zoebelein

In June 7th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 126, host Theo Mayer interviewed historian Dr. Jennifer Zoebelein from the National World War I Museum and Memorial. Zoebelein, who's a special projects historian at the Museum, recently took on directing a Commission project to create a series of World War I focused Educators' Toolkits, generally sponsored by the Andrew Mellon Foundation. Click here to learn more about Zoebelei, and her new project to create a series of toolkitson topics that address various social issues related to World War I.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Signing the Versailles Peace Treaty

Episode #128
Special Edition

Making Peace!
Harder Than Making War?

Host - Theo Mayer

This special edition is dedicated to exploring the Paris Peace Negotiations and the resulting Treaty of Versailles. For our exploration, we are joined by an extraordinary panel of guests including:

  • Military Historian, Sir Hew Strachan
  • Professor of International History, Margaret MacMillan
  • Woodrow Wilson Biographer, Professor Patricia O’Toole
  • American History Author, Garrett Peck
  • Citizen Historian and Artist, Katherine Akey
  • Former NPR Correspondent and WWI blogger, Mike
         Shuster

Literature in WWI This Week

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Final Post!

WWI Literature and Authority - Readers With a Vision of Peace

By Phil Klay

"Froth-corrupted lungs," "a ballet," "lies," "the most wonderful war in the world." These terms present the diverse ways writers have described WWI in literature. But which is the most accurate when it comes to relating the real experience of war? Who has the authority to tell the real story?

These are the questions National Book Award Winner, Phil Klay, contemplates as he surveys various literary works on WWI, written by soldiers, officers, nurses, writers, and intellectuals. In WWrite's closing post, Klay also provides insight into the ways reading and writing WWI have shaped contemporary thought on war's impact on culture.

Read "WWI Literature and Authority - Readers With a Vision of Peace" this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

The night of May 16, 1916, Lieut. Ewart A. Mackintosh's actions earned him the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry, as he attempted to rescue two of his seriously wounded men, injured in a raid on German trenches.

Read here one of the most poignant poems of the Great War, Mackintosh's "In Memoriam" written for Private David Sutherland and others who died that night.


Doughboy MIA for week of June 24

James O. Crooks

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is is Private First Class James Crooks. Enlisting at Fort McPherson, Georgia, on 23 May, 1917, James O. Crooks was originally born in Seneca, South Carolina in 1894, the son of James E. and Alice Crooks. James junior was one of 11(!) children of this farming family. Assigned to Company K, 47th Infantry for training, he was transferred to Company K, 9th Infantry in August, 1917, when he was also promoted to Private First Class. The 9th was part of the 2nd Division and it was with them he went to France in September, 1917. By 18 July, 1918 PFC Crooks had seen considerable combat when he was killed in action at Soissons. He is memorialized on the Tablets to the Missing at the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery at Belleau Wood. Nothing else is known about his case at this time.

Want to help shed some light on PFC Crooks’ case? Consider making a donation to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Lest We Forget jacket

 

"Lest We Forget: The Great War"

World War I Prints from the Pritzker Military Museum & Library 

As the United States commemorates the centennial of World War I, one of the nation’s premier military history institutions pays tribute to the Americans who served and the allies they fought beside to defeat a resourceful enemy with a lavishly illustrated book.  It is an official product of the United States World War One Centennial Commission. The story of WWI is told through the memorable art it spawned―including posters from nations involved in the conflict―and a taut narrative account of the war’s signal events, its major personalities and its tragic consequences; and the timely period photographs that illustrate the awful realities of this revolutionary conflict. Most importantly, this book is a tribute to those who served in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and what would become the Air Force. Proceeds from the sale of this book help fund the WW1 Memorial in Washington, DC. 

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.



Marshall Dunnaville, Sr.

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Marshall Dunnaville, Sr.

Submitted by: Wilhelmina Leigh {granddaughter}

Marshall Dunnaville, Sr. was born around 1888. Marshall Dunnaville served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

I never met my grandfather, Marshall Edward Dunnaville; he died before I was born. I have a few photographs of him, but none of him in his military uniform. The paper trail left from his World War I service indicates that he enlisted in the U.S. Army on August 1, 1918, in Roanoke, VA. He was a Private in Company D of the 807th Pioneer Infantry, a unit comprised of African-American servicemen, and he participated in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive in France.

While on his way to France and back, Marshall sent souvenir postcard folders to my grandmother-to-be, “the girl he left behind” but married upon his return. These folders featured scenes of Camp Upton, in Yaphank, Long Island, NY, and of Camp Lee, VA. The folder with photos of Camp Upton (postmarked August 25, 1918) was sent using a one-cent stamp, and the folder with photos of Camp Lee (postmarked July 8, 1919) was sent using a two-cent stamp! I would guess that he crossed the Atlantic Ocean on the U.S.S. Orizaba, because an unsent souvenir postcard folder with photos of this ship was also among his World War I memorabilia.

Read Marshall Dunnaville, Sr.'s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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June 18, 2019


One Hundred Years of the Los Angeles Victory Memorial Grove: Flag Day 2019 

Victory Memorial Grove Los Angeles

"If one had taken a short hike on Flag Day in Elysian Park in Los Angeles on the one hundredth anniversary of the dedication of the park and passed by the World War One monument there, your heart surely would have taken a patriotic beat at what you witnessed. A proud display by a striking color-guard, a moving rendition of our National Anthem, and heroic tales of bravery in the field all added to the remarkable feeling of dignity and gratification at being an American." So writes Bill Betten, California WW1 Centennial Task Force Co-Director, of the ceremony in Los Angeles last week.  Click here to read Bill's entire report on the Centennial event in Los Angeles.


"It is we who have had the privilege of talking to survivors of the First World War that must now keep the memory of the Great War alive."

Attila Szalay Berzeviczy

An interesting new World War I-themed photo book project will come out later this year. The 640-page book, entitled "„In the Centennial Footsteps of the Great War“, the book will be a tribute to the centennial of the First World War, done through contemporary imagery. We spoke to the book project's author, Attila Szalay-Berzeviczy, about the book's photography, and the book's aims. Attila has an interesting background -- he is an economist, a photographer, the founder of Historical Military Photos Ltd, and the former President of the Budapest Stock Exchange. Attila took some time to talk to us about his amazing World War I project, and share some of the incredible photography featured in the volume.


"Never Forget Garden" initiative represents America’s sacred duty to remember veterans

Never Forget Garden

The Centennial Commission has been partners and friends with a number of organizations over the years. Among them is a very special group -- the Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. This group has a strong focus -- to make certain that the individuals that made the ultimate sacrifice of their life for our freedom are not forgotten, and that the general public understands this price of freedom. The members of the Society are preparing for the Centennial of the arrival of the first Unknown at Arlington National Cemetery. To help us all mark this special anniversary, Society members have developed a new initiative to help us to remember the service of our veterans, and the memory of our fallen. We were able to talk with the Project Director, Richard Azzaro, about the project.


World War I home front featured at Lindbergh site for one more summer

Families on the WW1 Home Front Tour

Over the last several summers, visitors to the Charles Lindbergh Historical Site have had the chance to take a look into the lives of people on the home front of World War I, thanks to volunteers and staff reenacting life on the Lindbergh property at the time. That will come to an end after this summer. In its final year, visitors can come enjoy the program Saturday July 6, July 20, Aug. 3, Aug. 17 and Aug. 31. Through a tour of the Lindbergh home, visitors learn  some of the things people went through during the war on the Home Front. Click here to read more about the World War I programming at the Charles Lindbergh Historical Site in Minnesota this summer.


Cathedral Of The Rockies Music Director Takes World War I Tribute To Belgium

Paul Aitken

20 years ago, Cathedral of the Rockies music director Paul Aitken composed a choral piece that captures the hope and despair felt by World War I soldiers on the fields of Flanders in Belgium. This month, Aitken will travel to Flanders to conduct a performance of "Flanders Fields" on June 23. He recently joined Idaho Matters to talk about the importance of the piece and performing it at the site of its inspiration.  Click here to listen to the PBS interview, and watch a video of the choral performance.


Reading, PA Rededicates One of the Nation's Oldest World War I Memorials

Reading WWI Memorial

The Great War ended on Armistice Day in November 1918; by June 8, 1919, the city of Reading, PA was dedicating a memorial to the 224 soldiers from there and surrounding communities. Reading rededicated its World War I 'Doughboy' Monument during a ceremony Saturday, June 8, the 100th anniversary of its original dedication. Click here to read more about the centennial rededication, including the unique story of the Doughboy sculpture atop the memorial structure.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Remembering Veterans: Hawaii WWI Centennial Task Force Chairman Colonel Arthur Tulak on the upcoming Honolulu WWI Symposium 

Colonel Arthur Trulak

In June 7th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 126, host Theo Mayer interviewed Colonel Arthur Tulak, Chairman of the Hawaii World War I Centennial Task Force. Colonel Tulak discusses Hawaii's role in the First World War, the activities of the Task Force, and an upcoming academic symposium in Honolulu. Click here to read the entire transcript of this podcast interview.

Commission News: Raising Money for the National WWI Memorial with Director of Development Phil Mazzara 

Phil Mazzara

In May 31st's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 125, host Theo Mayer spoke with Phil Mazarra, Director of Development and the Chief Fundraiser for the National World War I Memorial in Washington, D.C. Read on to learn more about the Mr. Mazarra's experience in the fundraising field, and the ongoing effort to raise enough money for the National Memorial- what he calls "the most meaningful project he's ever raised money for." Click here to learn more about Phil, and the status of fundraising for the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC

An Interview with Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission Executive Director Rebecca Kleefisch

Kleefisch

In May 31st's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 125, host Theo Mayer spoke with Rebecca Kleefisch about the background, mission, and plans for the Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission, of which she is the Executive Director. Click here to read a transcript of the interview, and learn more about to tell us about the Commission, the mission, and the plans for the centennial commemoration of the passage of the 19th Amendment.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Stars & Stripes last WWI issue

Episode #127
Highlights: Stars and Stripes

Aftermath of WWI Perspective - Host | @ 02:25

Stars And Stripes Last WWI Issue - Host | @ 04:15

Insights into Stripes - Robert H. Reid | @ 06:45

Preserving the Stripes’ Legacy - Laura Meyer & Sue Mayo | @ 10:05

Germany in Shock at Peace Treaty - Mike Shuster | @ 13:55

War Memoirs From WWI: “John Lucy” - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 18:15

WWI Genealogy Research Guide Update - Host | @ 23:50

American POWs in WWI - Col Greg Eanes, (USAF ret.) | @ 25:30

Mobile WWI Museum Update - Keith Colley | @ 32:20

Dispatch Highlights - Host | @ 40:15


Literature in WWI This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

WWrite Tripleheader!

This week, WWrite features three new posts in preparation for ending the blog series in June. National Book Award winner, Phil Klay, will write the last post next week, but before we say this final, exciting goodbye, we are honored to present the following authors this week:

1. They Shall Not Grow Old – and Neither Have We
By Teresa Fazio

This past January, amid headlines of US negotiations with the Taliban and lingering Syrian ISIL strongholds, former Marine Officer and award-winning freelance writer, Teresa Fazio, escaped internet news for an afternoon of 3D immersion in They Shall Not Grow Old, by Peter Jackson. But when she forked over twenty bucks for a ticket, she didn’t know that what would strike her even harder than this impressive technical reconstruction was the similarity of the youthful soldiers to my Marines in Iraq in 2004. Don't miss "They Shall Not Grow Old - and Neither Have We," by Teresa Fazio this week at WWrite!

2. Movies That Made Me - A Farewell to Arms
By Jenny Pacanowski

Often people ask former Army medic, Jenny Pacanowski, at her poetry events if she started writing before her deployment to Iraq in 2004 or before. She answers that it was watching old movies on her parent’s couch, that made her a poet. This week, she shares inspiration gained from the 1957 version of Hemingway's iconic WWI novel, A Farewell to Arms. While the time and circumstances were different, Hemingway's tale from almost100 years ago resonates with her experience as a medic in Iraq. Read Movies That Made Me - A Farewell to Arms by Jenny Pacanowski at WWrite this week!

3. When the War Didn't End
By Rob Bokkon

Every WWI aficionado knows the date and the hour. 11AM, Paris time, November 11, 1918. The Armistice and the end of the Great War. The world was free from tyranny. Safe for democracy, in the words of President Woodrow Wilson. As writer Rob Bokkon, this week's third WWrite contributor attests, however, on the global scale, tragic stories abound about how the war didn’t end on November 11, 1918. Part of these unknown stories involve American troops fighting the Bolsheviks in the nascent Soviet Union, and the lynching of African-American veterans in the South, often by their own brothers in arms. Read Bokkon's post, When the War Didn't End, to understand why he thinks these stories are just as much a part of the Great War narrative as the tales of heroism at WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

General George S. Patton is best known for his leadership in WW2, but in WW1, he served with the US Tank Corps.

Not many people know that Patton was also an enthusiastic writer of poetry: his poem dedicated to the tanks he commanded is one of his quirkier literary efforts.


Doughboy MIA for week of June 17

Earl Cliett

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Private Earl Cliett. Born in 1891 at Cairo, Georgia, Earl I. Cliett was the son of Lee and Amanda Cliett, farmers by trade, and one of four children. He was living in the town of Reno, in Grady County, Georgia when he enlisted in the Regular Army at Fort Thomas, Kentucky on 3 April, 1917; just days before President Wilson declared war on Germany. He was immediately assigned to Company I, 28th Infantry. He sailed on 14 June aboard the troop ship Tenedores, bound for France – one of the first contingent of American soldiers to arrive ‘Over There’, where the 28th Infantry would be an integral unit of the newly forming 1st Division. Private Cliett served in all the battles the 28th Infantry was involved in until he was killed in action on 20 July, 1918. He is memorialized on the Tablets to the Missing at the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery at Belleau Wood. He was the first soldier from Grady County, Georgia killed in the war and his family received word on 2 August, 1918.  Nothing else is known about his case at this time.

Want to help shed some light on Private Cliett’s case? Consider making a donation to to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Commemorative Hat

Commemorative Ball Cap

Inspired by the iconic image of a U.S. Doughboy, you can wear your American pride with this Made in the USA hat. The poignant lone silhouette of a soldier in trench warfare serves as a reminder of those who sacrificed so much one century ago. The Navy hat with white Doughboy embroidery is a 100% cotton, structured with contrasting pancake visor, sweatband and taping, and pre-curved bill. The velcro closure features U.S. flag emblem. A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included. Order your Doughboy Commemorative hat here.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.  Proceeds from the Official WWI Centennial Merchandise help to fund the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.



Maurice Herbert Roberts

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Maurice Roberts

Submitted by: Thomas, "T.J." Cullinane {Town Historian}

Maurice Herbert Roberts was born in 1900. Maurice Roberts served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

Forgotten Sorrow, Forgotten Valor.

In gazing at the serene visage of Maurice Roberts, one gets the impression of a young man who has wisdom beyond his years. Just eighteen when he volunteered for the Army, Maurice had seen his mother Carrie pass away at age 39 after a long and painful fight with uterine cancer. As his unit was preparing for overseas movement at Camp Syracuse, New York, he would learn of the death of his nineteen year old sister Melissa from tuberculosis.

In spite of these tragedies, or perhaps because of them, Roberts would fight with reckless abandon on the Western Front. He would be cited twice for bravery by the French government, a very rare distinction for a lowly enlisted man, before being killed in action during the opening stages of the Meuse-Argonne Campaign.

Maurice Roberts was born in Derry, New Hampshire on May 2, 1900, to Albert B. “A.B.” Roberts, a shoemaker and town selectman and the former Carrie E. Nutter. The family made their home at No. 2 McGregor Street in Derry. In addition to Maurice and Melissa, A.B. and Carrie had two older children, Rena and Alvin. Alvin, who preferred to be called by his middle name Burton, also served in the war. He would see heavy fighting while assigned as an artilleryman with the 103rd Artillery Regiment, 26th “Yankee” Division. Burton survived the war, but would die three years before his fortieth birthday. Maurice, a student who probably never held a full time job, enlisted in the Army at age 18 and was given serial number 39184. His stateside training would eventually take him to Camp Syracuse, a mobilization camp located four miles outside the city. Here, he would be assigned to the 9th Infantry Regiment. The 9th Infantry was, and remains, a distinguished regular army unit. They are known as the “Manchus” a nickname they earned during the Boxer Rebellion in China where three of the their members had earned the Medal of Honor.

Read Maurice Herbert Roberts' entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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