Riveters pilots in dress uniforms African American Officers African American Soldiers 1 doughboys with mules The pilots gas masks Mule Rearing

Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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November 6, 2018 

Bells of Peace reverse

Bell Tolling Time Is Here! Bells of Peace to ring out November 11 across nation

Over 10,000 people and organizations have signed up for the Bells of Peace project, promising to toll bells on November 11, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. local time to commemorate the Centennial of the Armistice and the service and sacrifice of the nation’s veterans. Bells will be tolled 21 times, at 5 second intervals, across the nation and wherever Americans gather to honor their veterans. It’s not too late to register and participate! Download the free app on the App Store or Google Play, and register and upload images of your community’s commemoration event. Or, register on our website at ww1cc.org/bells. And click here to find out what other organizations nationwide are participating in Bells of Peace next Sunday, November 11, including the National Museum of the Marine Corps, and many others.


"A First Look" offers detailed tour of new National WWI Memorial in Washington, DC

First Look banner

From November 8-12, the "First Look Pavilion" provides an all day immersive multimedia presentation of the coming National World War I Memorial, at the location of its future home in Washington, DC. The Pavilion will feature large graphics, video, and physical display to provide you with  "A First Look" at what the memorial will be, offer you some insight into how it has come about, and show the Memorial's current status. You'll also learn how you can participate in its ultimate creation, including video taping your reaction and thoughts after your "First Look." With your visit to the First Look Pavilion, we want to leave you with a clear concept and vision of this wonderful tribute to the men and women who, 100 years ago, helped shape the world we live in today. Click here to learn more about the First Look Pavilion, including hours of operation, and how you can support the Memorial.

The Memorial site will be open to the public daily beginning with a presentation of colors at 8 a.m. and concluding with “Taps” at sunset daily, November 8-12. The “First Look” program will also include a series of special events. You can attend the Special Events in person by registering for free tickets, or watch via live video stream here if you are not in the DC area. Click here to find out more about "A First Look" this week.


The Remarkable World War I Story
of Colonel Charles Young's Ride

Colonel Charles Young

When the United States entered World War I, segregation was entrenched in military culture as well as civilian society. It put barriers up to prevent African Americans from enlisting. Despite this, about 380,000 African Americans served in the U.S. military during the war. Colonel Charles Young, of Wilberforce, Ohio, was the highest-ranking African American Army officer when American joined World War I in 1917. As such, Young was a remarkable success story. But despite an impressive leadership record, the Army refused Young’s request to command troops in Europe. Military leaders told him he was not healthy enough to serve. To prove his fitness, Young made an incredible horseback journey that is still being honored 100 years later. Click here to find out more about Colonel Young's  ride.


Marine Iraq Vet Secures Corrected Headstone for Great-Uncle Killed in WWI

Turley headstone

The century-old wrong done to a Marine private fatally wounded on the last day of battle in World War I will finally be made right this coming Veterans Day at Arlington National Cemetery, thanks to another Marine who worked to correct the record on his behalf. Arlington officials have approved a small ceremony on Nov. 11 at the grave of Marine Pvt. Joseph Otto Turley in Section 18, site 1345, to mark the installation of a new headstone with his correct date of death: Nov. 12, 1918. For Garrett Anderson, Turley's great-nephew and a Marine veteran of Fallujah, it's the culmination of an undertaking that required him to delve into U.S. and family history to unearth the true story of his uncle's service. Click here to read the entire story of how a modern day Marine kept faith with a fellow Marine from World War I.


World War I Centennial Ceremony Marks American Operations in Belgium

Fountain at Flanders Field Cemetery

Flanders Field American Cemetery in Belgium hosted a ceremony on October 27, 2018 to mark the 100th anniversary of American operations in Belgium during World War I. Featured speaker was the Vice Chair of the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission Edwin Fountain (left). In his remarks, he talked about the partnership between our two countries, and also told the story of two Americans who served in WWI: one an American literary legend after the war, and his younger brother, who remained in Belgium forever. Click here to read about the memorial services, and the remarkable story of two brothers who served.


Honor Your WWI Ancestor with a Personalized WWI Coin Display

Coin Display

You can now purchase the limited edition US Mint World War I Commemorative Coin, in combination with our specially-designed display stand, personalized with information about your WWI ancestor. This will make a great collectible gift for family members and descendants of those who served in World War I. Personalization can include: rank, full name, enlisted date, deceased date, unit/decorations, battles, cemetery, etc. If you have already purchased the Commemorative Coin from the US Mint, you can also order just the personalized display. Both the combo set and display alone are available at https://shop.worldwar1centennial.org (click on US Mint Commemorative Coin at the top navigation bar). Supplies are limited. Proceeds from the sale of this item go towards funding the building of the National World War One Memorial in Washington DC.


Natick armory dedicated to Medal of Honor recipient from South Boston

Michael J. Perkins

One fateful October day a century ago during World War I, Private First Class Michael J. Perkins crawled up to a nest of enemy machine gunners that were throwing grenades at his platoon and waited for just the right moment. When the Germans opened the door, he tossed a bomb inside. Then forced his way in and attacked the machine gun crews, and single-handedly forced them to surrender. The courage that the South Boston war hero displayed on the battlefield was recalled last week when the Massachusetts National Guard dedicated an armory in his honor. Click here to read more about Michael Perkins, and the WWI heroism that led to the naming of the armory in his honor.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Remembering Veterans: Carolyn Timbie on Grace Banker and the Hello Girls

Grace Banker.

In October 26th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 95, host Theo Mayer spoke with Carolyn Timbie, granddaughter of prominent Hello Girl Grace Banker. In the interview, Ms. Timbie answers questions about her grandmother's remarkable story, and about her own personal  journey through France following her grandmother's footsteps. Click here to read a transcript of the inspiring interview.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo new

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Skeleton on battlefield

Episode #96
Highlights: November 1918 Overview

Host: Theo Mayer

Preview of podcast over the coming weeks | @00:20
November 1918 Overview - Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer | @02:40
Maneuvering both military and diplomatic - Mike Shuster | @18:15
WWI WarTech: The Wristwatch - Host | @21:55
Commission News: The coming week of commemoration - Host | @24:30
Arlington County WWI Commemoration Task Force - Dr. Allison Finkelstein | @26:00
No Armistice from the flu - David Pietrusza | @34:45
100 Cities / 100 Memorials’ effect on Arizona - Neil Urban | @42:30
Speaking WWI: Foxhole - Host | @49:05
The Buzz: Social Media selections - Katherine Akey | @50:35


Literature in WWI This Week

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A Distant Field: America's Great War Highlanders

The literary centennial week kicks off with bagpipes and kilts.

WWrite takes a look at RJ MacDonald’s WWI historical novel, A Distant Field, which will be released on November 11, 2018. A former US Marine and Royal Air Force Reservist and veteran of Libya and Iraq, MacDonald has written the first in a series that follows the characters, Stuart and Ross McReynolds, Scots-Americans who survive the sinking of the Lusitania.

Together with four Irishmen, a Canadian, and a young English officer, they join Scotland’s Seaforth Highlanders and head towards the bloody battlefields of WWI. Read the preview and behind-the-scenes look at this unprecedented literary perspective of the Great War on WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

Marion Angus

Following the Scottish theme, the "Behind Their Lines" Blog this weeks looks at Ballad of Remembrance. Marion Angus's poem "Remembrance Day" tells of the heart-ache that traditional ballads evoked after the Great War.  This forgotten Scottish poet had a “genius for telling a story in a few verses, of almost unbearable poignancy.”


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Commemorative watch

Armistice 1918 WWI Commemorative Watch

This 1918 limited edition of numbered watches by Col&MacArthur (Belgium) honor those American sol­diers who valiantly fought for our freedom. Behind its sleek design and unalterable symbols, the Armistice 1918 watch commemorates the date of November 11, 1918 - the end of The Great War.

  • Two (2) Year Manufacturer's Guarantee
  • Includes deluxe packaging with a leaflet telling the story
  • Only 1918 watches made. Limited Edition with Serial Number
  • American buyers: This timepiece is Swiss made in batches and will begin shipping to US around Dec. 1, 2018, just in time for Christmas giving.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
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George Wiley Byrd

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

George Wiley Byrd


Submitted by:
COL Victor H. Stephenson {Cousin}

George Wiley Byrd was born around 1893. George Byrd served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

PFC George Wiley Byrd (5/17/1893 - 7/15/1918) son of Samuel Randall Byrd and Mary Jane "Sissie" Roberts.

PFC George Wiley Byrd, 3rd Trench Mortar Battery, 3rd Artillery Brigade, 3rd Division. Killed in Action near Fossoy, France on July 15, 1918. He died in one of the most famous battles of WWI. The evening of July 14th found the 3rd Trench Mortar Battery with six mortars in position along south bank of Marne opposite Glands, with working party digging pits for remaining Mortars near Mezy.

At midnight on 14 July 1918, the 3rd Division earned lasting distinction. Engaged in the Aisne-Marne Offensive as a member of the American Expeditionary Force (AEF) to Europe, the 3rd Division was protecting the French capital of Paris with a position on the banks of the Marne River.

Read George Wiley Byrd's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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October 30, 2018 

Public WWI Centennial events in the Metro Washington, DC area Nov. 8-11

First Look vertical

Washington, DC will be the site of a number of remarkable World War I-themed events, exhibits, and activities during the days leading up to, and beyond, the Armistice Centennial. The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission is honoring the more than 4 million Americans who served in during WWI, and the 116,525 men and women who sacrificed their lives, with a “First Look at the National World War l Memorial” program between November 8 and 12, 2018. The Memorial site will be open to the public each day beginning with a presentation of colors at 9 a.m. and concluding with “Taps” at sunset daily. The “First Look Pavilion” will be open 11 am to 5 pm each day. Click here to read more about A First Look, and all the other commemorative events presented by the Commission and other organizations in DC.


National WWI Museum and Memorial Commemorates the Centennial of the World War I Armistice Nov. 1-11, 2018 

Mueums snip

Firing on the First World War’s Western Front ended on Nov. 11, 1918. This year marks 100 years since the stillness fell across the battlefields of Europe on the “the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month.” To commemorate the end of World War I, President Woodrow Wilson officially recognized Nov. 11 as Armistice Day – a day of somber remembrance recognized around the world, with many stopping for a moment of silence at the 11th hour of this day to honor those who brought about the end of the “Great War.” The National WWI Museum and Memorial will capture the world’s attention with activities for all ages to commemorate the end of the war, beginning Nov. 1 through the centennial of the World War I Armistice on Nov. 11. Click here to read more about the big list of commemorative activities scheduled at the Museum.


The historic Liberty Bell in Philadelphia is onboard as the Honorary Bell of Peace

Liberty Bell

The World War I Centennial Commission and the National Park Service have designated the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia as the Honorary Bell of Peace to commemorate the Centennial of the Armistice on November 11, as part of the Commission's nationwide Bells of Peace project. The Liberty Bell, the most prominent and revered bell in the nation, is on display in Philadelphia at the National Park Service’s Independence Park. Click here to read more about the Liberty Bell, and the plans at Independence Hall in Philadelphia to participate in Bells of Peace.


Trench recreation opens near site of WWI trench training at Fort Benning, GA

Fort Benning trench exhibit

As part of the garrison's centennial celebration Oct. 19, 2018, Fort Benning, Georgia, officially opened a recreation of the training trenches the U.S. Army Infantry School used on post nearly 100 years ago. The new trench, which the Directorate of Public Works dug out recently, is meant to educate visitors about the post's previous training mission. It is a short walk from a small portion of the original training trenches that many decades had weathered and overgrown. Camp Benning was established at a site near Columbus, Georgia, Oct. 19, 1918, after the Infantry School staff and students arrived from Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Part of the training they conducted was in trench warfare. Click here to read more about the new trench exhibit, and about Ft. Benning's important role in training U.S> Army personnel in WWI.


American Legion Post 43 in Los Angeles and the California World War I Task Force co-host WWI Armistice Centennial event

California WWI Cenetnnial Task Force Logo

The California World War I Centennial Task Force and the American Legion Post 43 in Los Angeles are teaming up for a special Armistice Centennial Event—and You’re Invited! The California World War One Armistice Centennial Commemoration Event takes place on Monday, November 12th, 2018, 1:30 p.m. at American Legion Hollywood Post 43, 2035 N Highland Avenue, Los Angeles 90068. The event is Free.  Refreshments will be provided. Presenters at the event will showcase period newspaper articles and text from those engaged in the war effort. Music from the era will also be performed. Click here to read more about this commemorative event, and the California World War I Centennial Task Force.


World War I Armistice Film Festival ordering opportunities close tomorrow!

Film Festival Posters

LAST CHANCE TO ORDER...

The Armistice Film Festival order window is closing at 5pm Eastern on Wednesday, October 31.

We are excited by the many festival hosts who are holding this unique Veterans Day Weekend event. Your communities are sure to appreciate this special - and not insubstantial - effort to bring information, education and entertainment about WWI into the centennial of the Armistice.

Festivals include:  Several city tour - RI | Friday Harbor, WA | Irwin, PA | Muscle Shoals, AL | Watford City, ND | Harrington, WA | Austin, MN | Brownsville, OR | Fredericksburg, VA | Newburgh, NY | Lynchburg, VA | Washington, DC | Marysville, CA | Wayland, NY | Honolulu, HI | Brooklyn Center, MN | Livonia, NY | Bryan, TX | Los Angeles, CA |

And a special thanks to the nearly 100 of you who contacted us, greatly interested but who were not able to undertake the logistics of holding a film festival in your communities this Veterans Day weekend.

Still thinking about having a film festival? Click here right now!


New Orchestra of Washington hosts World War I Armistice Concert "End of the War to End All Wars"

Joseph Turrin

On Saturday, November 10, 2018, the New Orchestra of Washington will host a concert dedicated to the Armistice Day on November 10 at 5 pm at the Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G Street Northwest Washington, DC. At the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, World War I – the Great War – ended. The New Orchestra of Washington, Washington Master Chorale, and Musica Viva NY commemorate this solemn occasion one hundred years later with a co-commission from acclaimed American composer Joseph Turrin (left), based on texts by war poets. The program also features works by Holst and and Ravel, both composers directly affected by World War I. Click here to learn more about this musical remembrance of the end of World War I.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

All About Pigeons: Andrew Blechman

Andrew Blechman

In October 19th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 93, host Theo Mayer spoke with journalist and renowned pigeon expert Andrew Blechman (left), a name that we frequently encountered while researching pigeons for Episode 92. In the interview, Mr. Blechman answered questions about this unique bird, its long relationship with humanity, and of course, how the pigeon impacted the War that Changed the World. Click here to read a transcript of the entire interview, but be forewarned: this interview is for the birds.

Events: Maestro Rik Ghesquiere and
'The Great War in Music'

Rik Ghesquiere

In October 19th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 94, host Theo Mayer spoke with Maestro Rik Ghesquiere, a Belgian conductor participating in a special WW1 commemorative event in Nashville on November 10th and 11th. Click here to read a transcript of the interview, edited for clarity:


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Brigadiere General Hunter Liggett

Episode #95 Highlights: Preparing for Peace & War

Host: Theo Mayer

Preparing for Peace & War - Host | @01:50

The fighting and plans continue - Mike Shuster | @08:40

America Emerges: Brig. Gen. Hunter Liggett - Dr. Edward Lengel | @12:35

Live Streaming Armistice events - Host | @19:30

Events around the nation - Host | @21:35

Pvt. Roy W. Hamm Tribute Train - Ted Lemen | @23:15

“Hello Girl” Grace Banker - Carolyn Timbie | @28:40

Century of Sound - James Errington | @36:05

Speaking WWI: Nothing to write home about - Host | @44:25

WWI WarTech: Flexing the new arsenal - Host | @45:35

Articles & Posts: The Dispatch - Host | @47:35

The Buzz: Social Media Posts - Katherine Akey | @52:05


Literature in WWI This Week

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A WWrite Blog exclusive!

WWrite asked Donald Anderson, Professor of English and Writer-in-Residence at the United States Airforce Academy, to write a post about WWI for the blog.

Anderson's Gathering Noise from My Life: A Camouflaged Memoir, was named by the Christian Science Monitor as one of “12 Electrifying Memoirs” of 2012. A few days after WWrite's request, he sent the following original piece, entitled "How Do Wars Begin?" A unique mix of poetry, prose, fiction, and history, "How Do Wars Begin?", brings together British poet Wilfred Owen, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, the Archduke's assassin, Princip, bombs, and an expired cyanide pill to put into question not only the origins of WWI but of all contemporary conflicts.

Read Anderson's powerful literary composition "How Do Wars Begin?" at WWrite this week!


Doughboy MIA for week of Month Day

Joseph Teeters

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Private Joseph C. Teeters. Born June 20th, 1890 in Hopewell, Pennsylvania, Joe Teeters was drafted April 26th, 1918. He was sent to Camp Taylor, Kentucky and trained with the 24th Company, 6th Battalion, 159th Depot Brigade. He embarked for overseas service July 22nd, 1918 and ‘Over There’ was assigned to Company A, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd ‘Rock of the Marne’ Division. With that unit he was killed in action on October 2th, 1918 during the Meuse-Argonne Campaign. Nothing further is known of his case at this time.

Private Teeters’ case is an excellent example of why we need YOUR help. Solving these cases takes research, and research costs money. Why not give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Lapel Pin 2

WWI Centennial Commemorative Lapel Pin

 Proudly Wearing the WWI 100 Years lapel pin is a fantastic way to let folks serving in the military, along with veterans, know that we still honor those who served our country one hundred years ago.  This satin nickel lapel pin is a simple, yet meaningful, way to display your pride and remember those who sacrificed throughout our nation’s great history. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item goes towards funding the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Julian Sobieski

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Julian Sobieski

Submitted by: Anthony Sobieski {grandson}

Julian Sobieski was born around 1896. Julian Sobieski served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

Private Julian Sobieski was born in Plock, Poland, on September 16th, 1896, to Leon & Antonina Sobieski. He immigrated to the United States on July 21st, 1914 through the Port of Philadelphia, PA. Julian settled in Bridesburg, the Polish section of Philadelphia. By 1917, he worked at the Disston Saw Works in the Tacony section of Philadelphia.

Julian registered for the draft on June 5th, 1917. The block 4 question on his draft card asks about Citizenship Intention: He wrote in “Will be a citizen of the USA”. My grandfather wanted to serve his adoptive country to earn his U.S. citizenship.

Julian was drafted on July 5th, 1918 and assigned to the 53rd Pioneer Infantry Regiment (PIR), HQ Company. The 53rd PIR was the old 47th New York Infantry Regiment with lineage going back to the Civil War. The 53rd PIR HQ Company had 213 men assigned, the majority of which came from New York and Pennsylvania. The men of the company were a mix of German, Italian, and Irish backgrounds, with only a few Poles, my grandfather being one of them.

Read Julian Sobieski's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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October 23, 2018

University of Illinois at Chicago sets
11 Days of World War I remembrance symposia and multimedia events

UIC Symposium

With "The War that Made Today: An Interdisciplinary Commemoration of the End of World War I" the University of Illinois at Chicago offers an incredible eleven days of World War I-themed events, to include panel discussions, symposia, exhibitions, and more. The interdisciplinary conversations and events will explore the war that transformed our contemporary world. Click here to read more about this free commemorative event.


Bells of Peace gaining momentum coast to coast with more state, city, and local proclamations issued for November 11

Bells of Peace logo vertical

The Veterans Museum in Atlantic County, New Jersey, Falls Township in Pennsylvania, and the United Methodist Church of Picture Rocks, Pennsylvania are just three of the governments and organizations who are pledging to toll bells on November 11 to honor the 4.7 million Americans who served in uniform in World War I, and the 116,516 who gave their lives in service. The Bells of Peace program asks individuals, private and religious organizations, and governments agencies at all levels to toll bells at 11:00 a.m. local time November 11 in remembrance of those who served and sacrificed. More state governors have issued proclamations in the last week asking their citizens to participate, and more are expected. So what about YOU? Click here to learn more about you and your church, school, community organization, veterans group, firehouse, or anyone else with a bell to ring can participate in this growing national commemoration event on November 11, 2018.   And don't forget: There's an app for that!


"Battle’s O'er" bagpipes project will loudly commemorate the end of WWI

Piper

The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission is supporting the efforts by DC-based bagpiper Tim Kirkpatrick, who is taking part in "Battle’s O'er", an international commemoration marking 100 years since the guns fell silent at the end of World War I. "Battle’s O'er" takes place on November 11th 2018, with events throughout the United Kingdom, Channel Islands, the Isle of Man, and at scores of locations overseas, including New Zealand, Ireland, Australia, Bermuda, France, Belgium, Canada, the United States and Germany. Click here to learn more about the "Battle’s O'er" campaign in the United States and around the world.


New "Hello Girls" Musical in NYC debut

Hello Girls play logo

The World War One Centennial Commission has officially endorsed "The Hello Girls - A new American Musical" being produced at the 59E59 Theatres in New York, New York from November 13th to December 22nd. Writer and artistic director Cara Reichel, and co-writer Peter Mills have created a musical play to bring to life the story of the Hello Girls. Reichel and Mills wanted to make this musical an immersive event true to the historical experience of what these women went through and accomplished while having the job of being a Hello Girl. Click here to learn more about the "Hello Girls" musical, and how to get tickets to see the play in New York.


Money Museum has new WWI exhibit — with a brand-new virtual exhibit online

Trenches to Treaties coin

To honor the 100th anniversary of United States involvement in World War I, the Money Museum, operated by the American Numismatic Association (ANA) and located adjacent to Colorado College, is unveiling its newest exhibit: Trenches to Treaties: World War I in Remembrance. The exhibit showcases coins and paper money from combatant nations, art medals and military decorations, as well as weapons and uniforms to illustrate the events and effects of World War I politically, economically and socially. The Money Museum also offers a remarkable new Virtual Numismatic Exhibit as a companion to Trenches to Treaties. Click here to learn more about both of these remarkable new exhibits at the Money Museum.


Nebraska football players will wear "leather" helmets to commemorate WWI

U Nebraska helmet

To commemorate Veterans Day, Memorial Stadium and the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, the Nebraska football team on November 10 will wear uniforms intended to look like the uniforms Nebraska wore when Memorial Stadium opened in 1923. The helmet is designed to replicate a leather helmet. The primary surface appears dimpled, the way a leather helmet would be, with strap decals laid over the top. Click here to learn more about the commemorative uniforms for the Nebraska team in their game against Illinois.


Task force urges review of minorities' World War I valor awards

William Anderson

With American Legion support, a group of volunteers is proposing the first-ever review of World War I veterans who may have been denied a Medal of Honor due to racial or ethnic discrimination. Established by the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission, the Valor Medals Review Task Force is starting with the records of approximately 70 African-American soldiers -- in particular, those worthy of the nation's highest military award who may have been downgraded to a Distinguished Service Cross or received a French Croix de Guerre with palm. The task force will look at the records of other minority veterans, too, but is currently focused on African-Americans because of the legal structure of segregation at the time. Click here to learn more about the Valor Medals project and how the evaluation process will work.


Horse Heroes site honors the 1,325,000 American horses & mules that served in World War I for the United States & allies

Horse Heroes menu snip

Brooke USA, along with the World War One Centennial Commission, announce the completion of their Horse Heroes website, honoring American horses and mules who served in WWI. Horse Heroes is an extensive and meticulously researched web-based presentation documenting all aspects of the use of American horses and mules in World War One. The Horse Heroes site may be accessed on the World War One Centennial Commission website at: www.ww1cc.org/horses.  With more than 75,000 words of text and 250 images and video clips, the website is suitable as a resource for public school teachers as well as for college-level course material. Click here to learn more about this outstanding historical site.

332nd menu snip

Also recently completed on the United States World War I Centennial Commission web site is a section dedicated to remembering the men of the U.S. 332nd Infantry Regiment, and commemorating their service and sacrifice on the Italian Front in World War I. The site seeks to provide the descendants of those men with an opportunity to connect with the lives of their great-grandfathers, grandfathers, uncles or fathers by sharing the rich and complex story surrounding what those men experienced. Click here to learn more about the 332nd Infantry Regiment web site.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Remembering Veterans:
Dr. Virginia Dilkes

Dilkes

In October 12th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 93, host Theo Mayer spoke with commission volunteer Dr. Virginia Dilkes about her father, Charles Edward Dilkes, an Army engineer who served in France. Dr. Dilkes helped turn her father's diaries into a memoir, called Remembering World War I: An Engineer's Diary of the War,.which is now the basis for a stage production called, A Year in the Trenches, written by playwright James Rana. Click here to read a transcript of the entire interview.

Historian Corner:
Jim Leeke

Leeke

In October 12th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 93, host Theo Mayer spoke with Jim Leeke, author of the book From The Dugouts To The Trenches: Baseball In The Great War. In the interview, he answers a series of questions about the relationship between the major leagues, the players, and the War that Changed the World. Click to read a complete transcript of this deep dive into one of the most American of pastimes, baseball.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo new

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Belgian Refugee Children

Episode #94
Highlights: Liberation in Belgium

Host: Theo Mayer

Preface: Bells of Peace - Host | @00:20

100 Years Ago: Liberation in Belgium & refugees return - Host | @03:50

Insight into Germany - Mike Shuster | @08:45

America Emerges: 29th Division in the Valley of Death - Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:20

Commission News: Some upcoming events profiled - Host | @19:45

Belgian musicians in Nashville - Maestro Rik Ghesquiere | @24:10

Historian Corner: CMH & WWI, Part II - Dr. Brian Neumann | @31:10

More about pigeons: Revered & Reviled! - Andrew Blechman | @38:30

WWI WarTech: Seeing eye dogs - Host | @45:55

WWI Memorial in Dublin GA - Scott Thompson, Keith Smith & Buddy Adams | @49:00

Speaking WWI: Devil Dogs - Host | @56:15

Articles & Posts: Dispatch Newsletter | @58:10

Buzz: The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @60:00


Literature in WWI This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

Fictions of Rehabilitation 

By Mark Whalen, PhD

WWI saw a complete transformation in the ideas and institutions the government deployed to assist wounded veterans, especially in government-run healthcare.

University of Oregon English Professor, Dr. Mark Whalen, author of The Great War and the Culture of the New Negro and American Culture in the 1910sdiscusses his newbook, World War One, American Literature, and the Federal State, which examines the Homefront in the US in WWI, and specifically how American literature engaged with the fierce debates over the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, and over what the state was empowered to do, that roiled US society in the war years.

Read Dr. Whalen's insightful post, "Fictions of Rehabilitation," at WWrite this week!


Doughboy MIA for week of October 22

John Raniere

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is is Private John Raniere. This week’s MIA is very similar to last weeks MIA; in fact they were killed only one day apart and went overseas together. Born June 20th, 1892 in Grognardo, Italy, John Raniere came to America in 1916. Like last week’s man, Raniere was also a coal miner and also entered the service on September 21st, 1917, going to Camp Taylor, Kentucky for training with Company C, 151st Infantry (while last week’s man was in Company B of the 151st). He was then also transferred to Camp Shelby, Mississippi and from there went overseas with the same Camp Shelby June Automatic Replacement Draft on June 19th, 1918. He landed ‘Over There’ 12 days later and his final assignment was to Company H. 18th Infantry regiment, 1st Division with whom he was killed in action July 18th, 1918. No further details are known.

Private Raniere’s case is an excellent example of why we need YOUR help. Solving these cases takes research, and research costs money. Why not donate Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

tote bag

Canvas & Leather Tote

Function and style are combined in this lightweight and compact Canvas & Leather Tote. You can show your American pride while carrying this Made in the USA dark khaki tote. Plenty of room for keys, wallet, tablet and documents. A distressed “U.S.” imprint is prominently displayed on the bag and an exclusive fabric garment label commemorates the U.S. Centennial of World War One.

Tote features: Constructed of touch dyed canvas and lined with 400 denier nylon. Handles made of 6 Oz. top grain oil tanned leather, backed with 1” webbing. Handle is attached to bag with distinctive “X” tacks. Dimensions: 18.5” W (seam to seam) x 13.5”H x 5.0” T-bottom style gusset. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item will help fund the national WW1 Memorial in Washington, D.C.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


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Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

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Lawrence Reynolds

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Lawrence Reynolds

 

Pamela Jean Follstaedt Adams {Granddaughter}

Lawrence Reynolds born around 1894. Lawrence Reynolds served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1914 and the service was completed in 1920.

Story of Service

Night was descending and all the soldiers around him had fallen one by one.  They were picked off like targets at a carnival shooting game as the enemy sent shells whistling through the air toward the 9-man company.  He steadied himself behind his machine gun and waited for the next German to dare show himself in the clearing in the trees.  BOOM!  A bomb explodes and sends him hurling through the air.  BOOM!  Another bomb explodes and returns him to the bunker he coveted for shelter.  Was there help?  Were there reinforcements?  Would he survive?

This was the long night of May 8, 1918, Lawrence Reynolds had in World War I that awarded him a purple heart and a silver star.  Lawrence held the German forces away through the evening, by himself, until his buddies came to look for the squad in the morning and rescued him.  By keeping the Germans away he held the field for the allies and prevented a full attack by the Germans.

Read Lawrence Reynolds's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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October 16, 2018

A First Look Logo

The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission presents "A First Look” at the new National World War l Memorial in Washington, DC

The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission is honoring the more than 4 million Americans who served in during WWI, and the 116,525 men and women who sacrificed their lives, with the “A First Look at the National World War l Memorial” program November 8-12, 2018. The Memorial site will be open to the public each day beginning with a presentation of colors at 9 a.m. and concluding with “Taps” at sunset daily. The “First Look Pavilion” will be open from 11am to 5pm each day for guests to see the memorial model, learn where the memorial will be constructed, and find out how to be part of the project. The “First Look” program also includes several Special Events which require free tickets to attend. Click here to find out more about the “First Look at the National World War l Memorial” program and find out how to register for the Special Events.


The Bells of Peace program gaining great momentum, with important Federal, state, and local participation nationwide 

Capitol Bells

Late last week, the Commission received word that the bells at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC  (pictured at left) will join the national bell tolling on 11/11 at 11:00 am local. Another exciting pledge came in last week from the U.S. Navy, which directs all Navy and Marine Corps ships, commands and organizations to Execute a bell ringing ceremony to recognize the 100th anniversary of the end of WWI. Add several new states and a bunch of cities, towns, and many local organizations to the mix, and it looks like the nation is headed for a Really Big Ring on November 11. Want to be a part of it? Click here to learn more about you and your church, school, community organization, veterans group, firehouse, or anyone else with a bell to ring can participate in this growing national commemoration event on November 11, 2018.


New National WWI Memorial design gets key support from the NCPC in DC

NCPC logo

The new National World War I Memorial for the Nation's Capital achieved a significant milestone at the recent National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC) meeting. The NCPC adopted the Memorial's revised design concept for the Memorial, which will be sited in Pershing Park in downtown Washington, D.C. World War I Memorial is currently being reviewed by both the NCPC and the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, which are key regulatory agencies that oversee memorial-making in the nation’s capital. Each part of the design review process moves the WWI Memorial towards design approval, anticipated in early 2019. Click here to read more about the NCPC design review, and what the approval means.


#COUNTDOWNTOVETERANSDAY is Back!

Veterans

Over the past four years, the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission has run the #COUNTDOWNTOVETERANSDAY social media awareness campaign of Tweets and Posts on our Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram channels, to help shine our small light on veteran topics -- veterans issues, achievements, resources, organizations. We used the hashtag #COUNTDOWNTOVETERANSDAY because one day a year is not enough to think about America's veterans. There was great response to the campaign, and the hashtag was picked up widely in social media channels across the nation. This year is a special Countdown for us -- It is our Commission's last planned #COUNTDOWNTOVETERANSDAY campaign, and it is the 100th Anniversary of the Armistice that finally ended the fighting in World War I. Click here to read more about the 2018 campaign, and how you can be a part of the action.


Ebony Doughboys participate in WWI Centennial events in Belgium, France

Ebony Doughboys

U.S. Ambassador to Belgium Ronald Gidwitz joined the Ebony Doughboys (a group of American WWI re-enactors, partners to the WW1CC), local officials, residents of the Commune of Couvin, and mayors from French border towns to celebrate the liberation of Petite Chapelle by African-American soldiers fighting with the French 10th Army during World War I. This ceremony shed light on a forgotten chapter in U.S.-Belgian history and included the unveiling of a memorial in honor of the American regiment, the first permanent marker honoring the role of African-American soldiers in the war effort. Click here to read more about this multi-national Centennial event honoring WWI African-American soldiers.


World War I was front-and-center at 2018 AUSA convention in Washington, DC

AUSA 2018

World War I appeared front-and-center last week, as the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission (WW1CC) acted as a major participant in the recent 2018 Annual Meeting in Washington DC of the Association of the U.S. Army (AUSA). The WW1CC was down on the convention floor with a double-sized exhibit booth, featuring displays on the U.S. Mint 2018 Silver Dollar, the upcoming Bells of Peace nationwide tolling, as well as the scale-model sculptural Maquette of the new National World War I Memorial for the Nation's Capital. Dozens of WW1CC volunteers and staff helped to tell the booth visitors about the Commission, the war, and our efforts to honor Americans veterans. Click here to read more about the World War I presence at AUSA, the largest convention held annually in Washington, DC.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Remembering Veterans:

Dr. Erik Villard 

Villard

In October 5th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 92, host Theo Mayer spoke with U.S. Army Center for Military History Digital Historian Dr. Erik Villard. Dr. Villard and his organization help preserve the memory of the Army and have created a website devoted to the development and experience of the Army in World War I. Click here to read a transcript of the entire interview.

Updates from the States: Georgia

An Interview with Dr. Tom Jackson

Georgia seal

In October 5th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 92, host Theo Mayer spoke with Dr. Tom Jackson, Executive Director of the Georgia World War I Centennial Commission and retired Vice President for Public Affairs at the University of Georgia. In the interview, Dr. Jackson answered questions about Georgia's role in the war and the ongoing efforts to honor and commemorate Georgians who served. Click here to read a transcript of the entire interview.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Sgt. York Graphic Novel

Episode #93

Highlights: Sgt. Alvin York

Host: Theo Mayer

Peace Explored & Rejected - Host | @01:55

Atrocities in Syria - Mike Shuster | @08:55

America Emerges: Sgt. Alvin York - Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:35

Commission News: The schedule is published - Host | @21:20

Events: NY Transit Museum WWI Day - Kevin Fitzpatrick & Polly DesJarlais | @23:40

Remembering Veterans: Charles Edward Dilkes - Dr. Virginia Dilkes | @31:10

Speaking WWI: Teddy Bear Suit - Host | @38:25

Historian’s Corner: Baseball in WWI - Jim Leeke | @41:40

100C/100M: Springdale PA - Mayor Jo Bertoline & Patrick Murray | @48:10

Articles & Posts - Host | @55:10

Buzz: The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @58:20


Doughboy MIA for week of October 15

Private John Edward Shannon Jr.

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Private John Edward Shannon Jr.  The son of John and Della (Edward) Shannon, Private Shannon was born July 2nd, 1894 and was a coal miner when he entered the service on September 21st, 1917 at Newport, Indiana. Sent to Camp Taylor, Kentucky for training, he served first with Company B, 151st Infantry. He was then transferred to Camp Shelby, Mississippi and from there went overseas with the Camp Shelby June Automatic Replacement Draft on June 19th, 1918. He landed ‘Over There’ 12 days later and was sent to Company G, 23rd Infantry, 1st Division and with them was was killed during the Battle of Soisson on July 19th, 1918. His body was never found.

Private Shannon’s case is an excellent example of why we need YOUR help. Solving these cases takes research, and research costs money.  Why not donate 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Flag large

Fly the WW1 Centennial Flag on Veterans Day this year!

On December 19, 2014, Congress passed legislation designating Pershing Park in the District of Columbia as a national World War One Memorial. The Act authorizes the World War One Centennial Commission to further honor the service of members of the United States Armed Forces in World War One by developing the Pershing Park Site.

This WW1 Centennial Flag is made of durable nylon and measures 3'x5'.  This flag has the iconic Doughboy silhouette digitally screened onto it and has 2 brass grommets to hang the flag.

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item are designated for this endeavor. You can show your support, and help promote the efforts, by proudly displaying your custom flag.A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Frank Clark Nicholas

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Frank Clark Nicholas


Submitted by:
Dorothy Eleanor Nicholas {Daughter}

Frank Clark Nicholas was born April 28, 1892. Frank Nicholas served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 Chapter One The Official Record

My father, Frank Clark Nicholas, was inducted into the army September 10, 1917 at Local Board 63 Brooklyn, NY. He was 25 years old. He was honorably discharged May 9, 1919.

Dad was a Private 1st Class in Company M, 308th Infantry, 77th Division, American Expeditionary Forces (the Metropolitan Division _ New York’s finest). He received training at Camp Upton Yaphank, NY. He sailed from New York for England April 7, 1918. From Brest, France he returned to New York on April 28, 1919 sailing on the SS America. 

Dad’s ship leaving New York for England was probably the SS Statendam (the Statendam was torpedoed in July which corresponds to information in Dad’s letter dated July 23, 1918).

Read Frank Clark Nicholas' entire Story of Service here. 

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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October 9, 2018 

Bells of Peace App

Introducing the "Bells of Peace" Smartphone App

When we started to develop the Bells of Peace national bell tolling project for the Centennial of Armistice Day, we met and received advice from others, who also are or have created "bell tolling initiatives." In an early meeting, one of these sage supporters mentioned the challenges they faced due to the increasing scarcity of bells in America. "Why don't we make an App with bells in it?" one of the people at the meeting suggested. And here it is! Click here to find out all about the Bells of Peace app, and how you can get it for your iPhone or Android phone.


'To Honor and Remember" state-level WWI Centennial Summit Meeting held at Pritzker Military Museum and Library in Chicago

 

Honor and Remember Conference

On October 1st, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library (PMML) and the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission (WW1CC) co-hosted a unique event in Chicago -- a summit meeting of the various State-level Centennial Committees from around the entire United States. Events were designed to recognize the contributions by each organization in honoring the centennial of World War I throughout the U.S. Over twenty state-level organizations were represented at the summit. The following day, Tuesday, October 2nd, was the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission's 19th Quarterly Commission Meeting. Click here to read more about this two-day centennial commemoration confab in Chicago.


A Purple Heart for Sergeant Loyd

SGT Loyd, and of Perry James

On October 13th at the U.S. Army Training Center (TRADOC), at Fort Jackson, in Columbia, SC Brigadier General Milford H. Beagle, Jr., Commanding General, will host a Purple Heart Presentation Ceremony in honor of Sergeant Perry Loyd, a deceased World War I Veteran. Sergeant Loyd never received his Purple Heart, which was secured a few years ago by his grandson, Perry James. Mr. James will accept the medal in honor of SGT Loyd. The saga of SGT Loyd, and of Perry James' research into his grandfather is a remarkable one. Click here to read the entire fascinating story.


"We gave him a few resources, and a few opportunities. Magician that he was, David Shuey spun them into gold."

David Shuey

For four years, David Shuey, "The History Teller," performed as the U.S. WWI Centennial Commission's "General Pershing" in over fifty events, all across the United States. He played in Kansas City at the National WWI Museum & Memorial, Chicago at the Pritzker Military Museum & Library, New York City for the Veterans Day Parade, and for the Camp Doughboy, Baltimore for their living history days, Atlanta, Wisconsin, North Dakota, and on and on. Washington DC -- for four more parades, and for a host of major official events, and conventions. Sadly, The General recently lost his own personal battle with cancer. Chris Isleib, the Centennial Commission's Director of Public Affairs, tells us more about a remarkable historian who made an indelible mark on his nation's commemoration of the Centennial of World War I.


Hero carrier pigeon saved US troops during WWI battle 100 years ago

Wilson pigeon

In the third floor hallway of the Pentagon, just outside the Army Chief of Staff's office, there is a pigeon. That pigeon's name is "President Wilson" -- an unsung hero of World War I that made a daring flight to save U.S. troops exactly 100 years ago. Assigned to an infantry unit conducting operations near Grandpré during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, "President Wilson" conducted a heroic flight to deliver a life-saving message to U.S. troops on October 5, 1918. Click here to read more about a pigeon's heroics that earned him (or was it a her?) a permanent perch of honor in the Pentagon.


A major league baseball player died in battle 100 years ago: "one of the finest"

Eddie Grant

Eddie Grant had appeared in the World Series, with the 1913 New York Giants. He was a Harvard-educated lawyer. And after his playing career ended, at age 33, he enlisted in the U.S. Army, leading to his most lasting distinction: He was shot while leading an effort to rescue surrounded units of the 77th Division in the Argonne Forest in northeastern France on Oct. 5, 1918, becoming the first major leaguer killed in action in World War I. Click here to read the entire story of the heroism of the first of eight major leaguers who were killed or died while serving for the U.S. military during World War I.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Spotlight On The Media:
Colonel Douglas Mastriano

 

Doug Mastriano

In September 28th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 91, host Theo Mayer spoke with veteran, military historian and author Colonel Douglas Mastriano about his new book, Thunder in the Argonne. The book explores the greatest battle in American history from a variety of perspectives and brings to light some of its more obscure heroes. Click here to read a transcript of the interview.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo new

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Avian Intelligence pigeon

Episode #92
Highlights:October 1918 Overview

Host: Theo Mayer

October 1918 Overview Roundtable - Dr.Edward Legel & Katherine Akey | @03:55

Historians Corner: Lost Battalion - Ron Laplander | @20:00

Shifting sands and hard fighting - Mike Shuster | @26:40

Commission News: Honor & Remember in chicago - Host | @31:24

Commission News: Bells of Peace update - Host | @32:15

State Profile: Georgia - Dr. Tom Jackson | @33:40

Remembering Veterans: Story of John Foster - Mark Foster | @41:10

US Army CMH WWI Website - Dr. Erik Villard | @47:20

Spotlight On The Media 1: Dr. Edward Lengel | @52:40

Spotlight On The Media 2: Lost Battalion Documentary - Mark Fastoso & John King | @55:20

WWI War Tech: Pigeons - Host | @60:00

Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch - Host | @65:05

The Buzz: Selections from Social Media - Katherine Akey | @67:45


Literature in WWI This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

War, Not Allegory: WWI, Tolkien, and The Lord of the Rings

Why, in all the years since its publication in 1954, has J.R.R. Tolkien’s epic, The Lord of the Rings, never found its way onto any “Best-Of” lists of war literature? Why, in spite of the overwhelming number of parallels, has it never counted among the greatest novels to emerge from the events of World War I? Rachel Kambury, a publishing professional specializing in war and literature and military history, argues that The Lord of the Ringsis not allegory but war story in its own right. A WWI story. Read Kambury's enlightening post, "War, Not Allegory: WWI, Tolkien, andThe Lord of the Rings" at WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

The legacy of "Denial"

What does Brian Turner's "Here, Bullet," written during the Iraq War, share with Rupert Brooke's "The Soldier" and the poem "Denial" written by a Scottish tank commander in WWI? Dr. Connie Ruzich discusses connections in the latest blog post from Behind Their Lines


Doughboy MIA for week of October 8

Jefferies

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Private Charles Bates Jeffries, born in Ohio on July 21st, 1892, where he was drafted on May 31st, 1918. He was a member of Battery C, 15th Field Artillery Replacement Draft out of Ft. Jackson, South Carolina and with them went to France on July 21st, 1918. ‘Over There’ he was assigned to Battery D, 305th Field Artillery, 77th Division. With them he served during the Vesle River campaign and then in the Meuse-Argonne. During the campaign in the Argonne, Jeffries was assigned runner duties as part of a three man artillery spotter mission that was sent forward to work with the 308th Infantry Regiment and with them was killed as a member of the famous ‘Lost Battalion’. During a mistaken barrage on the unit by American artillery on October 4th, 1918, Private Jeffries was observed by his commanding officer, Lt. John Tiechmoeller, running toward his funk hole as the shells crashed down around them. He was not seen afterwards that anyone could recall. Following the relief of the ‘Lost Battalion’ on October 8th, Lt. Tiechmoeller went looking for Jeffries, but all he found was his blown in funk hole, which had taken a direct hit by an artillery shell. Nothing further of Private Jeffries was ever found.

Would you like to help us solve this case? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Window decal

U.S. Army “Doughboy” Window Decal

An easy and inexpensive way to let the world know what year it is!

Featuring the iconic Doughboy silhouette flanked by barbed wire so prevalent during WWI, you can proudly display this poignant reminder of the sacrifices made by U.S. soldiers.  

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


George Washington Willard

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

George Washington Willard


Submitted by:
Eric Wiech {Great Grandson}

George Washington Willard born around 18 Dec. 1892, George Willard served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

Pvt. George Washington Willard was born on December 18, 1892, in Madison, SD. His mother died when he was six. Soon after, he and his younger brother were placed in the Sioux Falls children’s home. From there, he was sent to live with a family that was quite poor. He worked long hours at farm labor, was fed little, slept in a bed bug-infested bed, only had socks hired men threw away, and had little schooling for two years. When he was constantly late for the little schooling he received, his teacher asked him why. After he explained, the teacher contacted the children’s home, which sent two women to check on his conditions. They immediately removed him from the home. He was placed into another foster home and lived/worked there until he was 17. 

Pvt. Willard was drafted into the Army on the 20th of September, 1917, when he was 24. On May 11, 1918, he would sail from New York, NY to Liverpool, England. Listed as his “in case of emergency” contact is a “friend” from Summit, SD, Miss Agnus Swanson.

Read George Washington Willard's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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