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Stories of Service

You can search for the name or unit and you will get a list of the stories that contain them.

A Tradition of Service Logo 75William Anderson

Submitted by: Nathaniel Jenkins, Jr.

5a6631ecdba2d Croix de Guerre

William Anderson born around 1894, William Anderson served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

My grandfather, William Anderson, a South Carolina native, was a real American War Hero. He was a quiet and warm man, a jack-of-all-trades born in the late1800s, and he lived a humble life in Asheville, North Carolina. He was part of an all-black regiment that fought with French soldiers against the Germans during World War I.

When my mother would take me and my sisters to visit him, he would frequently show us his medal that he had tucked away in an old tarnished tin Sucrets box. The medal, shaped like an Iron Cross backed by crossed swords, was marred with time; and it had an aged green and red ribbon attached. My grandfather would beam with pride every time he displayed the medal, but as little kids we didn’t fully understand the significance of his pride. Apparently, he wanted his grandchildren and great-grandchildren to know what he'd done--and to be proud of him.

Many years later, I discovered that Grandfather Anderson's efforts on the battlefield earned him a coveted French medal, the Croix de Guerre or Cross of War, for bravery in combat action. That's the same honor given Audie Murphy, the most decorated American combat soldier of World War II.

Read more: William Anderson

Itimous T. Valentine

Submitted by: Jacob Parks {Administrative Support Specialist, The Country Doctor Museum}

no photo 300Itimous T. Valentine born around 1887, Itimous Valentine served in World War 1 with the the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

Itimous T. Valentine (1887-1970) attended Guilford College in Greensboro before he enlisted in the North Carolina National Guard on December 15, 1917.

Valentine served in the Headquarters Company of the 113th Field Artillery as a private first class until he received a promotion to corporeal.

After returning from the “Great War,” Valentine married Hazel Armstrong and took up residence once again in Nash County, where he served as a farmer and attorney.

Read more: Itimous T. Valentine

Leonard Paul Denton

Submitted by: Jacob Parks {Administrative Support Specialist, The Country Doctor Museum}

no photo 300Leonard Paul Denton was born around 1892. Leonard Denton served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

Leonard Paul (it appears that Denton preferred his middle name throughout life) Denton was the second-youngest of five children born to William and Ruth Denton. Paul’s siblings were Fatina, Simpson, Gineva, and Marie. Paul Denton was born on September 8, 1892 in Nash County where the Denton family lived in the town of Jackson located north of Bailey.

At the turn of the century William Denton owned a farm in Jackson, while the children also served as farm hands. On August 2, 1914 Paul Denton married Mary Leona Brantley, also of Nash County.

Read more: Leonard Paul Denton

Warner C. Journigan

Submitted by: Jacob Parks {Administrative Support Specialist, The Country Doctor Museum}

no photo 300Warner C. Journigan was born around 1891. Warner Journigan served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

Warner C. Journigan (1891-1938) and his family were not originally from Nash County, North Carolina. By 1900 the Journigan family lived on a farm owned by their father in the Hayesville Township of Franklin County.

By the next decade, the family relocated east to Brinkleyville. However, Journigan lived in Nashville, N.C. by April 26, 1918, when he enlisted in the U.S. Army. Also part of the 113th, Journigan served in Battery E throughout his service during WWI.

Read more: Warner C. Journigan

Sherwood H. Brantley

Submitted by: Sherwood H. Brantley {Administrative Support Specialist, The Country Doctor Museum}

no photo 300Sherwood H. Brantley was born around 1897. Sherwood Brantley served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

Sherwood H. Brantley (1897-1970) was one of many children born and raised on their father’s farm in Nash County, North Carolina. Even after the war, in the 1930s and 40s, Sherwood Brantley continued to work a modest life as a farmer.

Brantley entered military service on July 24, 1917 and served in the Headquarters Company of the 1st Artillery (later called the 113th Field Artillery) of the North Carolina National Guard.

Brantley, along with two other Nash County residents (Warner C. Journigan and Itimous T. Valentine), served in the trenches of France from May 26, 1918 until they left St. Nazaire, France aboard the troop transport ship Santa Teresa on March 6, 1919.

Read more: Sherwood H. Brantley

William B. Wilson

Submitted by: Harold G. Delamater {Commander VFW Post 666}

William B. WilsonWilliam B. Wilson was born around 1893. William Wilson served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1916 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

Beacon’s Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 666 commemorates the 100th anniversary of the death of the solider who is the eponym of that organization -- Private William B. Wilson. He was killed in action in Belgium on August 19, 1918, the first soldier from Beacon to die in World War I.

Today, a century after his death on the battlefield, few know of him or the reason why the Wilson Post was so named. History can be fickle and easily forgotten after a generation or two, but Private Wilson’s story of sacrifice needs to be retold and remembered.

Wilson went off to war with two of his best friends, George Van Pelt of Beacon and Herbert Miller of Newburgh. The three, with about 50 other Beacon boys, joined up in Newburgh’s “Company L” of the 107 Infantry Regiment. By late April of 1918, the regiment had landed in France.

Read more: William B. Wilson

John Ora Johnson

Submitted by: Kathleen Susanne Johnston {grand daughter}

John Ora Johnson 1

John Ora Johnson was born around 1898 or so. John Ora Johnson served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

My grandmother, who insisted on being called John Ora, was part of the Emory University U.S. Army Unit that served from 1917-1919, principally in France.

She was enlisted during her nursing training by a Dr. Green, who said she was the best surgical nurse he had ever trained. It seems, from family legend, that she was rather too young to be in the U.S. Army as a nurse, but Dr. Green insisted, and she was shipped overseas via the Canadian Maritimes to escape German U Boats.

I have photos of her at this point and later. She is noted in the official history of the Emory Unit as R.n., a.n.c., and as having enlisted on April 15, 1918. She is listed in the history as available through address to the Davis-Fischer Santarium, in Atlanta, where she was a superintendent.

Read more: John Ora Johnson

Patrick McWhorter

Submitted by: Johnette Brooks {WWI Colored Troops Genealogist}

no photo 300

Patrick McWhorter was born around 1893. Patrick McWhorter served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1913 and the service was completed in 1917.

Story of Service

Pat(rick) McWhorter, a rifle-toting soldier was born the son of Henry McWhorter (originally Taliefero Co) and Julia Washington (Morgan Co), Georgia on June 25. 1894. He was the 9th born of 16 who lived.

He was previously enlisted in the (RA) Regular Army and stationed at Columbus Barracks OH as a member of the 25th Infantry of the 15th division of the Harlem NY National Guard. He was discharged from the RA on Apr 23rd and re-enlisted in WWI on Apr 24th of 1913. The 24th Infantry was one of the very first all black infantries formed in the WWI Era. They were sent to Houston to guard the new recruits from Chicago’s famed Illinois 8th Division National Guard.

Read more: Patrick McWhorter

Elmer James Lucy

Submitted by: Anthony Chakurian {Great Grandson}

no photo 300Elmer James Lucy was born around 1893. Elmer Lucy served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

Elmer James Lucy was born on 21 Nov 1893 in San Francisco, California. His service to his country started when he was drafted on 20 Dec 1917 into the U.S. Army. He reported to his Draft Board on 24 Dec 1917 in San Francisco where he was inducted.

Then Elmer Lucy was sent to Camp Lewis, Washington, where he was mobilized and trained. During his training, Elmer Lucy was selected to be in the military police and was added to Company A of the 4th Military Police, which was part of the 4th Infantry Division. His unit was shipped out to Europe from Hoboken, New Jersey on the ship the Wilhelmina on 10 May 1918.

Read more: Elmer James Lucy

Abraham Bock

Submitted by: Paul Osman {resident of village}

no photo 300

Abraham Bock was born around 1889. Abraham Bock served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

See attached article commemorating the 100th anniversary of our small village's first death in WW1. Printed in the Williamsville Village Newsletter (written by Paul Osman).

 

 

 

 

Read more: Abraham Bock

Pvt Gus Austin

Submitted by: Johnette Brooks {ALA Post 523 Mem/WWI Colored Troops Genealogist}

no photo 300Pvt Gus Austin born around 1888. Pvt Gus Austin served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

Red Clay Hero Buried @ Arlington National Cemetery

Series Article #2 by Johnette Brooks

Pvt. Gus Austin (Serial # 2,710,430) was born on March 22, 1888 in Milledgeville, Georgia to Robert and Rose Austin. He was inducted in the Selective Service in Philadelphia, PA on 30 APR 1918. He was mustered at Camp Meade (Middleton PA) and entrained into the 154th Depot Brigade.

After a very short training period, he was assigned to the very first all-colored 92nd Infantry Division’s 184th Infantry Brigade; 368th Infantry aka the “Buffalo Division”. Gus sailed from Hoboken NJ on the USS Geo Washington on 15 June 1918 and arrived in France on 19 June 1918.

Read more: Pvt Gus Austin

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