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Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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February 13, 2018

Military Medals

Just one week left to order World War I Commemorative Medals from U.S. Mint

The window closes on February 20 (or sooner) to order the United States Mint's five different Silver Dollar and Military Medal Sets. Each set includes a proof silver dollar and a proof silver medal. The medals, available only in these sets, recognize the contributions of the Air Service, Army, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, and Navy during World War 1. These sets, limited to 100,000 units across the five product options, can be ordered only until 3 p.m. on February 20, 2018, unless the limit is reached prior to that date. Production will be based on the orders received within this window. Fulfillment of these sets will begin in late May 2018.

Dollar

The United States Mint is producing the World War I Centennial Silver Dollar to commemorate the centennial of America’s involvement in World War I and honor the more than 4 million men and women from the United States who served. Purchases of the Dollar, available in both Proof and Uncirculated versions, will help build the new National World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC. The World War I Centennial Silver Dollar purchases are fulfilled immediately, and it will be on sale throughout 2018.


Corporal Freddie Stowers awarded Medal of Honor for service and sacrifice in WWI

 

Stowers

Corporal Freddie Stowers was an African-American war hero born in 1896 in Anderson County, South Carolina. Despite the discrimination he faced there, he made the decision to serve our country on the segregated 371st Infantry Regiment. He was serving as the squad leader in Company C of that regiment, in the 93d Infantry Division, during the attack on Hill 188, in the Champagne Marne Sector of France. He was killed in action that day, but his exceptional bravery and leadership lived on, earning him the Medal of Honor posthumously. Read the entire inspiring story of Corporal Freddie Stowers here.


National World War I Memorial sculptural maquette to make its national television debut on "Fox & Friends" Friday, Feb 16

Clapper Board

The new scale-model sculptural maquette, depicting the initial design concept for the new National World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC, will make its national television debut on the "Fox & Friends" program on Friday, February 16, in a segment airing sometime between 6:00 a.m. and 9:00 a.m. Commission Chair Terry Hamby, along with WWI Memorial sculptor Sabin Howard, will be on hand to discuss the Memorial and the sculpture for an enormous national television audience. Check it all out on the "Fox and Friends" program this Friday morning!


New Mexico WWI Centennial Commission formed with Governor Martinez as chair

New Mexico Commission

The New Mexico Department of Veterans Services has announced formation of the New Mexico World War I Centennial Commission to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I.The  Commission, chaired by Governor Susan Martinez, will work locally on the National WWI Centennial Commission’s nationwide effort to educate Americans about the war. New Mexico’s commission will host events around the state highlighting New Mexico’s impact on the war and the sacrifices made by its citizens less than five years after becoming our nation’s 47th state. Read more about the new New Mexico Centennial Commission and its members here.


WWI’s Zeppelin bombings popularized the nightime fashion trend of ‘Pyjamas’

Pajamas

World War I introduced so many terrifying new ways to die, and chief among those was, of course, death by air. You didn’t even have to be a soldier. For Londoners, the threat began in January 1915, when the Germans sent Zeppelins loaded with bombs across the Channel. Eventually, they sent planes, too. The air raids, often at night, accomplished little tactically, but their true purpose was to terrorize civilians and try to sink British morale. Bringing the war to the home front, the raids intruded in the bedroom, the most private space of all. And thus, they had quite an effect on fashion. Read more about how, just days after the first Zeppelin raid over England, British women were already dressing for bed to be prepared to “meet the midnight world at a minute’s notice” -- and how those wartime bedtime wardrobe innovations still dress us for sleep a century later.


Service on Islay to remember the tragic sinking of troopship SS Tuscania in 1918

SS Tuscania service Islay

A service of commemoration has been held on the Scottish island of Islay to mark the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the troopship SS Tuscania, which carried more than 2,000 US soldiers at the end of World War One when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat close to the island. Many of the soldiers on board were saved and cared for by local people but more than 200 drowned, with the bodies washed up on the beaches of the small island. Services included a wreath-laying ceremony at the American Monument, and a memorial service at Kilnaughton Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery, held at the grave of Private Roy Muncaster, the only US soldier still buried on the island. Read more about this solemn remembrance of a century-old military tragedy here.


New mural & exhibit in Tampa honors World War I crew of USCGC Tampa

USS Tampa

One hundred years after the sinking of the USS Tampa during World War I, a new mural was unveiled on February 3 honoring the more than 130 men - including 24 from Tampa Bay - who were killed when the ship was sunk by a German submarine. During a dedication ceremony at the the Tampa Bay History Center, Robin Gonzalez read each of the names of Tampa residents who were aboard the USS Tampa warship when it sunk in 1918. Afterwards, city leaders and descendants of those who died tossed memorial wreaths onto the water across from the history center. Read more about the ceremony and the mural, all part of a community effort to ensure that the USS Tampa "will never be forgotten again."


Herbert Hoover’s Meatless, Wheatless World War I diet way ahead of its time?

Alcazar cake

So you’ve started a vegetarian, gluten-free diet, but did you remember to complete your pledge card to send to the U.S. Food Administration? This is — of course — no longer a reality, but 100 years ago it was, when Herbert Hoover suggested changes to the American diet to support the war effort. When Hoover became the “food czar” in April 1917 upon America’s entry into World War I, the U.S. Food Administration had been created to encourage patriotic conservation of certain ingredients for the war effort. Since his recent stint as chairman of the Commission for Relief in Belgium, Hoover understood the logistics behind a large-scale food operation. Read more about how Hoover’s USFA, in order to supply hearty non-perishables — beef, wheat, and sugar — to American soldiers and Allies overseas, asked for cooperative (and gustatory) sacrifice from civilians.

Other Links:

Hear about this on the Podcast: Episode #58

Read President Wilson's actual proclamation from the Official Bulletin Page #3


George Kenney, Aviator and American Hero Who Fought In Both World Wars

George Kenney

Every soldier who puts his life on the line is a true hero. However, some amazing souls go the extra mile and really reach for the stars in their service to their country. One of them is George Kenney, a US Army Air Force General. Kenney not only mastered his position for 30 years as a true professional, but he took part in multiple battles – not to mention both World Wars – with gusto, earning him a decorated military record for his efforts. Once the US entered WWI in April 1917, Kenney found himself ready to become a part of history, earning numerous decorations in two wars as he blazed a trail of innovation and combat excellence in the skies for the United States. Read more about George Kenney and his aviation exploits here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

Library of Congress image of a US Army Soldier in the trenches from 1918

Episode #58
Food Will Win The War:

Food Will Win The War - an overview | @01:55

History through the lens of Food - Dr. Libby O’Connell  | @05:40

War in the sky | @10:30

America Emerges - Dr. Edward Lengel | @11:45

Great War Project - Mike Shuster | @17:25

Great War Channel on Youtube - Indy Neidell & Flo Wittig | @21:05

Family’s History - Ambassador Carol Moseley Braun | @29:25

Remembering Veterans - Dr. Richard Slotkin | @34:30

A Century in the Making - Maquette on Fox and Friends | @42:45

Speaking WWI - Hooverized Recipes | @44:45

States - Ohio web site - Amy Rohmiller | @46:10

The Buzz - Katherine Akey | @52:25


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Navy service coin set

World War I Commemorative Centennial 2018 Silver Dollar and NAVY Medal Set

ORDER NOW. $99.95

The COIN design, titled “Soldier’s Charge,” depicts an almost stone-like soldier gripping a rifle. Barbed wire twines in the lower right hand side of the design. Inscriptions include “LIBERTY,” “1918,” and “IN GOD WE TRUST.”

Navy coin face

The NAVY SERVICE MEDAL design depicts a U.S. Navy destroyer on escort duty after deploying a depth charge in defense of a convoy. Above, kite balloons provide Navy personnel a platform to spot submarines and other dangers. The inscription “OVER THERE!,” is at the bottom of the design.

Navy coin back

The reverse design depicts an Officer’s Cap Device* used in World War I. The inscriptions are “UNITED STATES NAVY,” “2018,” and “CENTENNIAL OF WORLD WAR I.”

These sets are limited to 100,000 units across all five medal product options, and can be ordered only until 3 p.m. ET on February 20, 2018, unless the limit is reached prior to that date. Production will be based on the orders received within this window. Fulfillment of these sets will begin in late May 2018.

Produced by the US Mint, the World War I Centennial 2018 Uncirculated Silver Dollar, the Proof Silver Dollar and the 5 service medal combination sets are all available for a limited time directly from the US Mint.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Clarence Mathias Hensel 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Clarence Mathias Hensel


Submitted by:
T.J. Cullinane, community historian

 

 

Ohio farmer Clarence Mathias Hensel was a soldier of the Great War serving as an infantryman in both the 84th “Rail-splitter” Division and the 78th “Lightning” Division.

Clarence was born on April 16, 1893 to John Hardin and the former Elizabeth Casper in Cessna Township, a small community located in Hardin County in northwestern Ohio. From his draft registration card we learn that Clarence was 24 years old when America entered the World War One and was employed as a farmer on the farm belonging to his father, John Hensel. The farm was located on Rural Route Number 4 in Kenton. Kenton lays claim to great American military heritage as John Wilson Parrot, a Union soldier and the first recipient of the Medal of Honor, would call Kenton home after the Civil War.

Clarence was of medium height and medium build with blue eyes and dark hair. He noted on his registration card that he had weak eyes. In spite of his defective eye sight, Clarence was inducted into the U.S. Army on June 28, 1918 and given serial number 3533412.

Read Clarence Mathias Hensel's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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February 6, 2018

Commission shares U.S. Mint WWI commemorative coin with key partners

Coin in box

A few days ago, the U.S. Mint opened sales for their new collective 2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar. This new coin was authorized by Congress as a tribute to the American men and women who served during the war. Sales from the coin help support our centennial programs -- so the coin is a tangible way for people across the country to directly participate in America's World War I Centennial. Since that opening sales day, our Centennial Commission has had the honor of sharing this new silver dollar with a few of our commemorative partners, organizations who help veterans and their families every day, and groups who remember and tell the story of America's sacrifice during World War I. Read more about the Commission's WWI Commemorative Silver Dollar organizational gifts here.


New "Ohio in World War I" web site goes live!

Ohio web site logo

Welcome Ohio!  The Ohio World War I Centennial Committee's new website is now officially operational at the URL ww1cc.org/ohio At the new "Ohio  in World War I" web site you will find information and photos that tell the story of Ohio in the Great War, as well as an event calendar, a timeline, and a growing map of the state’s World War One monuments, memorials, and historical sites. Ohio joins a growing number of state sites hosted by the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission. To see the other states’ sites, click here.

Amy Rohmiller

Amy Rohmiller of the Ohio Committee gave us an interview this week about how the site came to be, and what the Ohio group is doing to commemorate the Centennial--click here to check it out.  And listen to an interview with Amy on the weekly WW1 Centennial News Podcast. We invite you to register for the WW1 Centennial News podcast live show or download here.


The Role of African Americans in WWI

African American Soldiers

Fifty years after the end of the Civil War, the nation’s 9.8 million African Americans held a tenuous place in society. Ninety percent of African Americans lived in the South, most trapped in low-wage occupations, their daily lives shaped by restrictive “Jim Crow” laws and threats of violence. But the start of World War I in the summer of 1914 opened up new opportunities and changed American life and culture forever. “Recognizing the the significance of World War I is essential to developing a full understanding of modern African-American history and the struggle for black freedom,” argues Chad Williams, Associate Professor of African Studies at Brandeis University. Read more about the pivotal effects of WWI on African American history here.


New National Postal Museum Exhibition Celebrates Women’s Service in WWI

Nurse WWI

“In Her Words: Women’s Duty and Service in World War I” opened Feb. 2 at the Smithsonian’s National Postal Museum. The exhibition, open through May 8, offers a glimpse into the lives of four women serving in and alongside the American military during World War I. Through letters, uniforms, ID badges, notebooks and other authentic objects, the exhibition reveals the wartime experiences, personalities and aspirations of two U.S. Army Nurses, a U.S. Navy Yeoman and a YMCA worker. Visitors will learn about and see evidence of the work these women performed and the circumstances in which they served. Read more about this new Smithsonian exhibition here.


St. Lawrence Student receives national, international attention for WWI research

Tanveer Kalo

Tanveer Kalo, a former intern at the World War I Centennial Commission, was previously profiled in the May 16 and August 29 issues of DISPATCH last year, continues to draw attention for his research into Indian Americans who served in the U.S. Armed Forces in WWI. The local Watertown, NY Ledger recently interviewed Tanveer, and discovered that even in small-town New York, there are connections to be found with Indian Americans who served their new nation in the Great War a century ago. Read the entire newspaper interview here.


Frank Luke, Jr.: The Most Valuable Contributing Flying Ace in World War I

Frank Luke Jr.

In World War I, attacking through the air was a brand new form of warfare; it provided for various tactical uses such as reconnaissance, air superiority and close air support of ground troops. During this time period, two bold aviators, Edward V. Rickenbacker and Frank Luke, Jr were pioneers on this new front of technology in the war. While each man made a sacrifice and risked his life in the hopes of making a difference in the war’s outcome, Frank Luke, Jr. was the pilot who made the most valuable contribution to the War effort in World War I due to his personal sacrifice and the mission he carried out during his flying career. Read the entire analysis of  Luke's aviation combat legacy here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

Base Hospital No. 59, in France where Josephine Heffernan served.

Episode 57
Highlights:

Feb. ‘18 overview - Ed Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer | @01:40

War In The Sky 1918 preview - RG Head | @11:20

Fighting in Russia - Mike Shuster | @18:20

Harlem’s Rattlers - Dr. Jeffrey Sammons | @22:40

A Century in the Making - The maquette arrives in DC | @30:00

Speaking WWI - Attaboy! | @35:40

Nurse Josephine Heffernan - Dr. Marjorie DeRosier | @37:30

100C/100M Beaverton Michigan - Ed Rachwitz & Scott Govitz | @43:25

WWI War Tech - Gas Masks | @47:55

Articles & Posts - Dazzle Camo & S.S. Tuscania sinks | @49:45

The Buzz - WWI Social Media - Katherine Akey | @51:55


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Army Medal Set

World War I Commemorative Centennial 2018 Silver Dollar and Army Medal Set 

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY: These combination coin and service medal sets will only be available until Feb. 20, 2018

ORDER NOW. $99.95

The COIN design, titled “Soldier’s Charge,” depicts an almost stone-like soldier gripping a rifle. Barbed wire twines in the lower right hand side of the design. Inscriptions include “LIBERTY,” “1918,” and “IN GOD WE TRUST.”

Army Obverse

The SERVICE MEDAL design depicts a soldier cutting through German barbed wire while a second soldier aims a rifle amid a shattered landscape of broken trees and cratered earth. A shell explodes in the distance.

Army Reverse

The reverse design depicts the United States Army emblem, which was also in use during World War I. Inscriptions include “OVER THERE!,” “CENTENNIAL OF WORLD WAR I,” “2018,” and “UNITED STATES ARMY.”

These sets are limited to 100,000 units across all five medal product options, and can be ordered only until 3 p.m. ET on February 20, 2018, unless the limit is reached prior to that date. Production will be based on the orders received within this window. Fulfillment of these sets will begin in late May 2018.

Produced by the US Mint, the World War I Centennial 2018 Uncirculated Silver Dollar, the Proof Silver Dollar and the 5 service medal combination sets are all available for a limited time directly from the US Mint.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


William Anderson

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

William Anderson

 

Submitted by: Nathaniel Jenkins, Jr. {grandson}

 

 

My grandfather, William Anderson, a South Carolina native, was a real American War Hero. He was a quiet and warm man, a jack-of-all-trades born in the late1800s, and he lived a humble life in Asheville, North Carolina. He was part of an all-black regiment that fought with French soldiers against the Germans during World War I.

 

When my mother would take me and my sisters to visit him, he would frequently show us his medal that he had tucked away in an old tarnished tin Sucrets box. The medal, shaped like an Iron Cross backed by crossed swords, was marred with time; and it had an aged green and red ribbon attached. My grandfather would beam with pride every time he displayed the medal, but as little kids we didn’t fully understand the significance of his pride. Apparently, he wanted his grandchildren and great-grandchildren to know what he'd done--and to be proud of him. 

Many years later, I discovered that Grandfather Anderson's efforts on the battlefield earned him a coveted French medal, the Croix de Guerre or Cross of War, for bravery in combat action. That's the same honor given Audie Murphy, the most decorated American combat soldier of World War II.

Read William Anderson's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


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January 30, 2018

Army Medal

Army medal leads way as U.S. Mint sells half of max 100,000 WWI Coin/Medal sets on first day

Nearly half of the maximum 100,000 sets of the World War I American Veterans Centennial Coin & Medal sets were recorded sold by the U.S. Mint after the first day on sale. As reported by Coin World, a total of 47,061 sets have been sold, with 11,272 containing a U.S. Army medal, 9,343 representing the U.S. Air Service, 9,334 sets featuring the U.S. Navy, 9,417 sets containing the U.S. Marines medal, and 7,695 sets for the U.S. Coast Guard medal, through January 22. The sets went on sale on January 17. For a collector to obtain all five medals, orders would have to be placed for each of the five sets, since the medals are not being offered individually. The Mint is accepting orders for the sets during the first 30 days of the commemorative coin program, and will stop after the sales period ends or when sufficient orders are received across all five set options to exhaust the 100,000-set limit. So if you are thinking about buying a WWI Medal, or a set of medals, better order as quickly as the Army medal is moving. 

World War I Centennial 2018 Uncirculated Silver Dollar

 The World War I Centennial Silver Dollar (pictured at left) will be available for purchase online from the Mint through to December 28, 2018. The Mint sales website is www.catalog.usmint.gov.


A Soldier’s Journey, and the Journey of Fame, Part 1: The Beginning

 

Howard in studio

When the Huffington Post web site decided to do a series of articles on sculptor Sabin Howard (left) and the new National World War One Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington DC, it turned out that they had a real expert on Howard already on hand: contributing writer Traci Slatton, who also happens to be Sabin's wife. As one might imagine, Slatton's insider perspective very much informs her description of the "wild ride" that her husband has been on since he and his design partner architect Joe Weishaar won the competition to design and build the National World War I Memorial. In the first article of the series, Slatton discusses how "There is a personal human cost to a war; even 100 years later, that cost deserves to be honored. In the same way, there is a personal, human cost to making this memorial, and I am writing about it in this series to memorialize that. Artists and their families are people, too." Read the entire first article of this ongoing series here.


SS Tuscania sinking by U-boat in 1918 kills 200 American soldiers off Scotland

Islay graves

February 5, 1918: The sun was setting as the liner S.S. Tuscania and the British convoy made its way toward the cliffs of Scotland through icy gale-force wind and rough seas. Shortly before 6 p.m. a huge shock sent a tremor through the entire ship; all the lights went out at once, followed by the explosive sound of shattering glass. There was no question what had occurred: the Tuscania had been hit by a torpedo. On board were over 2,000 American troops. Read the entire story of the dramatic rescues that reduced the death toll, the tragedy of the unfortunates who were not saved, and how the local Scottish communities remember the event and those who were lost.


American World War I fighter ace's incredible letters to be auctioned

Aircraft

A fascinating archive of wartime letters from a U.S.-born fighter ace who served with British forces during World War I are up for auction in the U.K. Lt. Edgar Taylor was born in Rhode Island to British parents and served in the British Royal Flying Corps, which merged with the Royal Naval Air Service to become the Royal Air Force in 1918. Taylor, wrote home to a recipient known only as "Ruby" during the four months he spent serving with the Royal Flying Corps in 1918. “The content of the letters is superlative,” according to the auctioneer. Read more about this "incredible archive" showing "the matter of fact way this young man dealt with life and death situations" here.


The painstaking process behind those wild WWI “Dazzle” naval paint jobs

Dazzle

Allied ships like the USS Siboney (left) frequently spent 1918 and 1919 dressed up in outlandish "dazzle" paint schemes. The idea was for ships to be seen, “but seen incorrectly,” according to Jennifer Marland, Curator of the National Museum of the United States Navy. If paint could be used to distort a ship’s angles, the thinking went, that would “make it difficult for the ship to be targeted efficiently by a submarine.” But how to test the efficacy of a given scheme for a given ship? The answer: tiny models. Read more about how the U.S. Navy created a vast library of dazzle-painted miniature ships--and maybe saved their real counterparts from torpedoes.


A centennial of subterfuge: the history of Army PSYOPS since World War One

Balloon

On January 23, 2018, the U.S. Army reached a historic milestone: one hundred years of dedicated psychological operations support to military and national security objectives. Of course, the practice of using psychological tactics to influence foreign populations predated 1918. However, it was not until World War I that the U.S. waged the first orchestrated military propaganda campaign in its history, establishing two agencies specifically for that purpose. The 100-year journey of Army PSYOPS from leaflets carried by hydrogen balloons in WWI (left) to the modern sophisticated methods of "delivering selected information and indicators to foreign audiences to influence their emotions, motives, objective reasoning, and ultimately the behavior of foreign governments, organizations, groups, and individuals" started with a team, never numbering more than thirty assigned and attached officers and soldiers, that went operational in August 1918. Read more about the WWI roots and the subsequent evolution of Army PSYOPS here.


Famed film director Peter Jackson is making a movie about World War One

Peter Jackson

Peter Jackson's next directing project has nothing to do with fantastical worlds: it's a World War One documentary, produced in association with 14-18 NOW, (the London based organization responsible for the poppy display at the Tower of London), set to coincide with the centennial of the war's end. Never-before-seen, century-old footage has been mined, restored, and hand-colorised from the archives of the Museum and the BBC, and will be edited into a feature - in 2D and 3D - by Jackson himself. The film focuses on the experiences of the people involved in the five-year war, as opposed to the larger strategy and politics, working from hundreds of hours of interviews with veterans. Read more about what Jackson says will not be "the usual film you would expect on the First World War" here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

British soldier grin at their captured 1918 Mauser Tankgewehr anti-tank gun

Episode 56
Highlights:

100 Years ago: About President Woodrow Wilson | @01:45

Special Guest: John Milton Cooper Jr. | @07:45

War in The Sky: Introducing General Billy Mitchell | @15:45

American Emerges: Baseball on the Polo Grounds - Dr. Edward Lengel | @16:40

European view of the war: Mike Shuster | @22:10

Special Commemorative Coin and Service Medallion Collector Sets | @27:05

A Century In The Making: Joe Weishaar | @28:25

Speaking WWI: Acronym flips RAMC and REPS | @34:25

Spotlight In The Media: Director Peter Jackson | @35:45

100C/100M: The City of Nitro, West Virginia - Rich Hively and Mayor Dave Casebolt | @38:50

WW1 War Tech: Tankgewehr - David O’Neal | @44:45

The Buzz: Social Media - Katherine Akey | @51:05


World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Dollar and Navy Medal Set

navy medal set

MUST ORDER NOW: These combination coin and service medal sets will only be available until Feb. 20, 2018. 

Collector Set: $99.95

The WORLD WAR I 2018 SILVER DOLLAR design, titled “Soldier’s Charge,” depicts an almost stone-like soldier gripping a rifle. Barbed wire twines in the lower right hand side of the design. Inscriptions include “LIBERTY,” “1918,” and “IN GOD WE TRUST.”

Navy Medal Obverse  

 

The NAVY SERVICE MEDAL design depicts a U.S. Navy destroyer on escort duty after deploying a depth charge in defense of a convoy. Above, kite balloons provide Navy personnel a platform to spot submarines and other dangers. The inscription “OVER THERE!,” is at the bottom of the design.

 

Navy Medal Reverse


The reverse side depicts a Navy Officer’s Cap Device* used in World War I. The inscriptions are “UNITED STATES NAVY,” “2018,” and “CENTENNIAL OF WORLD WAR I." (*Note that an official, uniform seal of the United States Navy had not been adopted at the time of World War I.) 

These sets are limited to 100,000 units across all five medal product options, and can be ordered only until 3 p.m. ET on February 20, 2018, unless the limit is reached prior to that date. Production will be based on the orders received within this window. Fulfillment of these sets will begin in late May 2018. 

Produced by the US Mint, the World War I Centennial 2018 Uncirculated Silver Dollar, the Proof Silver Dollar and the 5 service medal combination sets are all available for a limited time directly from the US Mint.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


John Mohamed Mondo

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

John Mohamed Mondo

 

Submitted by: Tanveer Kalo

 

 

John Mohamed Mondo (or Mando) served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

John Mohamed Mondo was born in the late 1890s in Calcutta, British India or Punjab, East India to Mohamed Noor.

At the age of 21, John immigrated to Laredo, Texas from Mexico on July 9, 1909 or 1910. His Border Crossing Card recorded his race as East Indian, as a polygamist, and birth place as Calcutta, India.

By 1917 John Mohamed settled in California and worked as a laborer. His World War I draft card recorded his race as Caucasian and his place birth as Punjab, East India.

Read John Mohamed Mondo's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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January 23, 2018

First dollar sale

The first official purchase of a World War I Centennial Silver Dollar was made by Colonel Gerald York (right), grandson of WWI hero Sergeant Alvin York. With him at the U.S. Mint gift shop is Acting Deputy Director of the U.S. Mint David Motl (left),

U.S. Mint opens sales of new 2018 WWI Centennial Commemorative Silver Dollar

World War I Centennial 2018 Uncirculated Silver Dollar

The United States Mint has opened sales for their new 2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar. This new coin honors the 100th anniversary of American participation in World War I.  The World War I Centennial Silver Dollar was authorized by statute in 2014 with bipartisan Congressional support. Surcharges from the sale of these coins are authorized to be paid to the United States Foundation for the Commemoration of the World Wars to assist the World War I Centennial Commission in commemorating the centennial of World War I. Also on sale by the Mint in conjunction with the Centennial Silver Dollar are five military medals, honoring the U.S. armed forces who served in WWI. Read more about the coins and how to purchase yours here.


Designer of national WWI memorial visits Joplin, Missouri for Scouting event

 

Weishaar at Joplin Scout event

The Boy Scouts of America and the country's efforts in World War I are closely intertwined. Even 100 years ago, Scouts planted gardens to feed soldiers, collected fruit pits and shells to be used in gas masks, gathered wood for weapons and more. Perhaps it makes sense then that a 27-year-old Eagle Scout will be in charge of memorializing America's World War I service members a century later. Joe Weishaar, a Fayetteville, Arkansas, native and Chicago-based architect, was selected in 2016 to lead the design of the World War One Centennial Commission's memorial in Pershing Park in Washington, D.C. Read more about Weishaar's message to the Scouts here. Read more about the new National World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC here. 


"The U.S. Navy was a key contributor to the German decision to end the war."

Dr. Dennis Conrad

The role of the U.S. Navy in the Great War is one that is, at times, debated, but mostly forgotten, primarily due to the lack of large-scale naval warfare and victories comparable to the Spanish-American War and later World War II. However, the Navy did provide crucial functions, including transportation of over 2.5 million soldiers, supplies, service as aircraft carriers, and more. Dr. Dennis Conrad, Historian at the the Naval History and Heritage Command, visited the Centennial Commission on Friday, December 1, 2017, and gave a presentation on the various operations performed by the U.S.Navy throughout World War I. Dr. Conrad holds a P.h.D from Duke University in history and has done extensive work for the NHHC researching and documenting Navy history from the American Revolutionary War up to the Spanish American War. He is currently working on a biography of Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy during World War I. We asked him a few questions after his presentation to the Centennial Commission staff.


True Sons of Freedom: African-American veterans of WWI were "pivotal figures"

Dr. Jennifer Keene

Often forgotten today, the African-American veterans of World War One were pivotal figures in the modern American civil rights movement who fought valiantly to break down racial barriers within the military and at home. Returning home with their heads held high, they inspired the next generation of black servicemen to continue the struggle against racial discrimination. Dr. Jennifer Keene, member of the Historical Advisory Board of the United States World War One Centennial Commission, tells the story of these largely-unsung Civil Rights heroes on the American Legion web site here.


When the Great War reached Wisconsin, Free Speech was the First Casualty

Wisconsin senator Robert LaFollette caricature mug

Once the United States joined the fight against the Kaiser in WWI, Congress and President Wilson’s administration implemented legislation and surveillance programs designed to keep America safe by ferreting out subversive activity and crushing dissent—especially in states like Wisconsin with a significant population of ethnic German-Americans. Even Wisconsin senator Robert LaFollette was accused of working for the Kaiser against America. The chilling effect of the both official and unofficial repressions of free speech in Wisconsin is explored thoughtfully on the Smithsonian Institution's What It Means to be American web site here.


Flu killed more American soldiers in World War I than any single battle

Fort Riley hospital clip

The second flu wave of 1918 coincided with the Meuse-Argonne Campaign of World War I, according to the National Institute of Health (NIH). Over 1 million U.S. troops participated, and it was our largest front-line commitment of the war. Statistics vary, but NIH reports that 26,277 American soldiers died during this campaign, the deadliest World War I battle for U.S. troops. However, the flu killed more U.S. soldiers than did any Great War battle: 15,849 U.S. soldiers in France and another 30,000 in stateside camps. That’s 45,849 killed by the flu versus 26,277 killed at Meuse-Argonne — documenting that the flu was by far our most deadly battle. Read more about how the great influenza epidemic wreaked havoc with American troops here.


Book & TV to tell story of Scotland-born American soldier who died on ship sunk by U-boat in World War I 100 years ago

The Drowned and the Saved

On February 5, 1918, German submarine UB-77 sank a British troopship, SS Tuscania, between Scotland's Rathlin Island and Islay. More than 200 men died – most of them young American ‘Doughboys’ on their way to the trenches of World War One. But one of the lost ‘Americans’ was actually born in the  nearby town of Bute, who had emigrated to the USA and had got caught up in the war in 1917, just after American joined the Allied cause. Scottish writer and documentary film-maker Les Wilson discovered the story of how  Bute’s Alexander McAlister became a soldier and victim of a U-boat. Read more about how Wilson has brought the century-old tragedy to a book and upcoming television program here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

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The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

This is a typical diving suit of the period. A variation of this deep sea diving suit called the Mark V was used from 1916 all the way until 1984

Episode 55
Highlights:

Government shuts down US Industries, shocking nation | @01:40

America Emerges: Military Stories From WWI - Dr. Edward Lengel | @11:25

Wilson’s 14 points examined - Mike Shuster | @17:05

US Mint releases commemorative coins and service collector sets | @22:40

A Century In The Making - Sabin Howard Part 2 | @24:50

Speaking WWI - Conk Out! | @30:55

Eagle Scout Memorial Project - Benjamin Woodard | @32:15

The Sunken Gold - Joseph A. Williams | @37:25

Erik Burro’s “Legacy of Remembrance” photo exhibit | @44:30

The messenger birds of WW1 | @45:25

Centennial of WW1 in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @46:30


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Listen to the silence. 
This is what Yoshi Oida, director of the unprecedented performance of Britten's musical masterpiece War Requiem at the Lyon Opera, asks of his spectators. 

Read about Oida's connection with WWI through stories about Hiroshima, the experience of children in war, and his latest film with Martin Scorcese. Don't miss this follow-up to last week's interview with Paul Groves, the tenor of Oida's show!


World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Dollar and Army Medal Set

Army Service medal

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY: These combination coin and service medal sets will only be available until Feb. 20, 2018. 
ORDER NOW. $99.95

The COIN design, titled “Soldier’s Charge,” depicts an almost stone-like soldier gripping a rifle. Barbed wire twines in the lower right hand side of the design. Inscriptions include “LIBERTY,” “1918,” and “IN GOD WE TRUST.”

The SERVICE MEDAL design depicts a soldier cutting through German barbed wire while a second soldier aims a rifle amid a shattered landscape of broken trees and cratered earth. A shell explodes in the distance.

The reverse design depicts the United States Army emblem, which was also in use during World War I. Inscriptions include “OVER THERE!,” “CENTENNIAL OF WORLD WAR I,” “2018,” and “UNITED STATES ARMY.”

These sets are limited to 100,000 units across all five medal product options, and can be ordered only unitl 3 p.m. ET on February 20, 2018, unless the limit is reached prior to that date. Production will be based on the orders received within this window. Fulfillment of these sets will begin in late May 2018.

Produced by the US Mint, the World War I Centennial 2018 Uncirculated Silver Dollar, the Proof Silver Dollar and the 5 service medal combination sets are all available for a limited time directly from the US Mint.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Edward Ball Cole 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Edward Ball Cole

 

Submitted by: Carolyn Cole Kingston {granddaughter}

 

 

Major Edward Ball Cole, Commander of the 6th Battalion of the 4th Marine Brigade, died from wounds received in the Battle of Belleau Wood on June 10, 1918. He is buried at the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery, Belleau, France.

My grandfather, Edward B. Cole, entered the Marine Corps in 1904 as a 2nd Lieutenant. Over the course of the next 13 years he served in Porto Rico, Mexico, and the Philippines. Beginning in July of 1917, Major Cole spent several months in command of the 1st, (later renamed the 6 th), Machine Gun Battalion of Marines training at Quantico, Virginia. Highly respected for his knowledge of the machine gun, he had by then invented a tripod to hold one and a portable cart to carry one. He had also published a book, A Field Guide for Machine Gunners, and served at Marine Corps Headquarters in Washington, D.C.

By the time of his departure for France on December 14, 1917, he was married to Mary Welsh, and had two sons: Charles H. Cole 2nd (my father) age 10, and Edward B. Cole Jr. age 8. Arriving in the port of St. Nazaire, France, he traveled by train to the Bourmont training area, where he and Captain Curtis (co-author of The History of the 6th Machine Gun Battalion) were housed in the village of Germainvilliers. In mid-March they moved to the Verdun sector where they were encamped at P.C. Moscou.

Read Edward Ball Cole's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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January 16, 2018

Doughboy statue sparks NJ historian's mission to photograph WWI monuments

Erik Burro

For years, Erik Burro would pass the statue of a WWI U.S. soldier every day on his commute just a few blocks from his city home and office but he paid it little attention. His realization in 2016 that the centennial of U.S. entry into World War in 1917 was approaching the following year made him stop and take a closer look at the Burlington statue depicting a Doughboy, and the memorial hall behind it. The visit to the statue triggered his curiosity and eventually led him to become a man on a mission to find and photograph other World War I monuments, first in South Jersey and then statewide, a quest that has resulted in traveling photography exhibits of major WWI monuments in the state. Read more about Burro's "Legacy of Remembrance" here.

Are you regularly passing by what could be a lost World War I memorial in a city, town, park, or cemetery? Stop and take your own closer look. Check on the National World War One Centennial web site Memorial Map and see if your local memorial is listed. If not, join the Memorial Hunters Club by submitting the memorial for inclusion on the national map. Here's how to submit a found memorial. 

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"Learn more about this war and its continued impact on us today"

Timothy P. Brown

Author/historian Timothy P. Brown has an interest in World War I, and his interest led him to a unique aspect of the war -- football. The game was in early stages of development at the time of the war, but it was already a nationally-popular pastime to play, and to watch. It was also a growing symbol that brought context and high-relief to the actions taking place in the war, and to the people who were fighting in it. His new book, Fields of Friendly Strife, follows the players of the 1918 Rose Bowl, on the field, and on the battlefields. Timothy Brown gave us some moments to discuss the book, the war, and how football was more than just a game.


Naval War College Museum unveils exhibit to teach about World War I

Sims

The U.S. Naval War College Museum in Newport, RI has unveiled a new exhibit to teach people more about World War I. It focuses on the Navy’s role in the war, using the career of Navy Adm. William S. Sims to tell the story. Sims commanded U.S. naval forces in Europe during the war, and his family donated artifacts for the War College exhibit. The Navy’s role in WWI was the learning ground where the officers who became the fleet's strategists in World War II figured out how to coordinate complex operations and forge relationships with allies. Sims went on to lead the war college. He changed the curriculum based on his experiences during the war and influenced a generation of naval leaders. Read more about Admiral Sims and the Naval War College exhibit here.


Unsung heroes of World War I: how carrier pigeons saved American lives

Cher Ami

Unsung heroes of World War I, the carrier pigeons of both the Allied and Central Powers helped assist their respective commanders with an accuracy and clarity unmatched by technology. The National Archives has a vast collection of messages that these feathered fighters delivered for American soldiers. Using these messages and the history of the carrier pigeon in battle, we can look at what hardship these fearless fowls endured and how their actions saved American lives. One of the most impressive things about the war records of the carrier pigeons was how widely the birds were used. Their service as battlefield messengers is their most known use, and the pigeons found homes in every branch of service. Read more about these essential feathered flying communicators here.


‘Astounding’ WWI painting on loan from UK coming to National WWI Museum

John Singer Sargent

John Singer Sargent (self-portrait at left) was an American artist, considered the "leading portrait painter of his generation" for his evocations of Edwardian-era luxury.  But he is remembered for his work as a combat artist in WWI.  Asked to create a work embodying Anglo-American co-operation, the 62 year-old traveled to the Western Front in July 1918, where he encountered "a harrowing sight, a field full of gassed and blindfolded men" that inspired his amazing "Gassed." The painting, currently on display at the Frist Center in Nashville, will make one more stop in the U.S. -- at the National World War One Museum and Memorial  in Kansas City -- before returning to the Imperial War Museum in London. Read how a special space and special welcome are being prepared for the monumental work.


Travel Documents for post-WWI Gold Star pilgrimages held at National Archives

Gold Star list

On March 2, 1929, President Calvin Coolidge signed PL 70-952. That law authorized the War Department to arrange for trips, designated as pilgrimages, by the mothers and widows to the overseas graves of soldiers, sailors, and Marines who died between April 5, 1917 and July 21, 1921. Congress later expanded eligibility to include the mothers and widows of men who were buried at seas or whose place of burial was unknown. After World War I, more than 30,000 American dead from that conflict remained overseas, buried in U.S. cemeteries. The passage of the law resulted from the work of the mothers and widows of those servicemen and their supporters who pushed for the pilgrimage to the gravesites at government expense. The resulting trips took place between 1930 and 1933. To facilitate travel by the mothers and widows, the Department of State established the “Special Pilgrimage Passport.” Read more about these unique travel documents.


World War I Centennial Ceremonies scheduled at ABMC sites in Europe

Cantigny American Monument in France

To commemorate and remember America's role in World War I, American Battle Monument Commission sites in Europe will host a variety of centennial ceremonies in 2018. Commemorations will kick off Memorial Day weekend 2018 with special ceremonies at Somme American Cemetery, Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and Cantigny Monument. The ceremonies will continue throughout the year, ending with the 100th anniversary of the Armistice. The ceremonies will mark the 100th anniversary of key events, such as the first World War I U.S. Offensive, the Battle of Belleau Wood, the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, and more. All the ceremonies are free to attend and open to the public. Read more about the planned ABMC centennial memorial ceremonies here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

Renault FT Tank

Highlights - Episode #54

1917 key events in review |@ 01:30

Wilson’s 14 points |@ 07:50

Crisis for the allies - Mike Shuster |@ 11:45

A Century in the Making - Sabin Howard |@ 16:45

Speaking WW1 - Tank |@ 25:00

The Education Program - Dr. Libby O’Connell |@ 26:30

100 Cities / 100 Memorials Round #2 deadline |@ 32:40

The Chaplains Corps in WW1 - Dr. John Boyd |@ 33:15

American Women Physicians in WW1 |@ 39:10

PAFA at Frist |@ 40:30

The Buzz - Katherine Akey |@ 41:15


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Benjamin Britten's Musical Masterpiece, War Requiem. Part 1: Interview with Tenor, Paul Groves

This week's WWrite blog post features the WWI musical masterpiece by British composer, Benjamin Britten–War Requiem.We hear from the world-renowned tenor, Paul Groves, on the unique performance of War Requiem at Europe's premier opera house, the Lyon Opera in France. Part poetry, party liturgy, part theater, see the ways in which this operatic representation has wowed the world. Through the lens of WWI, Groves talks about Pink Floyd, Hiroshima, Wilfred Owen, education, and his family's war history. Not to miss!


World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Dollar and Air Service Medal Set

Air Service Set

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY: These combination coin and service medal sets will only be available for 1 month. ORDER NOW. $99.95

The COIN design, titled “Soldier’s Charge,” depicts an almost stone-like soldier gripping a rifle. Barbed wire twines in the lower right hand side of the design. Inscriptions include “LIBERTY,” “1918,” and “IN GOD WE TRUST.”

The SERVICE MEDAL design depicts an iconic SPAD XIII, a World War I fighter flown by many Americans and valued for its speed, strength, and firepower, viewed from the top and side. The inscription “SPAD XIII” identifies the aircraft.

These sets are limited to 100,000 units across all five medal product options, and can be ordered only between noon ET on January 17, 2018, and 3 p.m. ET on February 20, 2018, unless the limit is reached prior to that date. Production will be based on the orders received within this window. Fulfillment of these sets will begin in late May 2018.

Produced by the US Mint, the World War I Centennial 2018 Uncirculated Silver Dollar, the Proof Silver Dollar and the 5 service medal combination sets are all available for a limited time directly from the US Mint.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Oscar Lubchansky

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Oscar Lubchansky

 

Submitted by: Gene Fax {Grandson}

 

 

Oscar Lubchansky born around 1896, Oscar Lubchansky served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

An AEF Veteran’s War Stories

These stories were told to me by my grandfather, former Sergeant Oscar Lubchansky (d. 1958), 2nd Battalion, 313th Infantry Regiment, 79th Division, American Expeditionary Forces.

Whether they are historically accurate is debatable, but they are an accurate representation of a veteran’s memories. At this late date, second-hand memories are all we’ve got.

American soldiers had an insatiable appetite for fresh eggs. Whenever Lubchansky and his comrades were en route and a halt was called, the soldiers would crowd around the kitchen door of the nearest farmhouse shouting, “Oofs! Oofs!” The farm wives would be frightened at first, but would soon figure out that the Americans wanted des oeufs and would pay for them. After that, all went well.

Read Oscar Lubchansky's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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